Male Protagonist with Award Winning Author Pam Lecky

Pam Lechy

I’d like to welcome Pam Lecky to Layered Pages today to talk with me about her male protagonist in her award winning book, The Bowes Inheritance.

Pam is an Irish historical fiction author and a member of the Historical Novel Society. She has a particular fascination with all things 19th century, from food and clothes to architecture and social history.

Her debut novel, The Bowes Inheritance, was published in July 2015 and has since been receiving excellent reviews. She is delighted to announce that it has been awarded the B.R.A.G. Medallion and was recently named as a ‘Discovered Diamond’ Novel. Last year it was short-listed for the Carousel Aware Prize (CAP) 2016 and long-listed for the HNS 2016 Indie Award. It achieved ‘Honourable Mention’ in the General Fiction Category of the London Book Festival Awards.

What is your male Protagonist name and who is he?

His name is Nicholas Maxwell. He is a landowner in his early thirties and is a highly respected local magistrate. When his neighbour, Jack Campbell dies, he sees it as an opportunity to get back Bowes Farm, which his father lost to Campbell in a game of cards. He is not pleased to discover that Jack has left the property to his niece, Louisa Campbell. He hated Campbell for many reasons but was also convinced he was involved in the recent Fenian activity in the north of England. When Louisa turns up to claim her inheritance he is not very pleased and does his best to chase her back to Ireland.

What are His strengths?

He is an honourable man; intelligent and has a sense of humour. He is protective of his family and does his best for them (even when they don’t want his interference!) When he eventually falls for Louisa he tries to do his best for her.

His faults?

Nicholas is quick to anger and holds a grudge. I like to think Louisa’s influence helps him overcome this as their relationship develops.

What is your personal opinion of him?

 I liked him very much. He was easy to write even though he was quite a complex character. I was greatly inspired by Georgette Heyer’s Max Ravancar from Faro’s Daughter; he starts out arrogant and self-assured only to be brought down several notches by love!

Does he ever do anything that surprises you?

 He was probably more forgiving than I would have been in his situation but I can’t tell you more than that as it would give the plot away!!

Synopsis

The Bowes Inheritance

 Romance and Intrigue in late Victorian England

Dublin 1882: When determined but impoverished Louisa Campbell inherits a large estate in the north of England, from an uncle she didn’t even know existed, it appears to be the answer to her prayers. Her younger sister, Eleanor, is gravely ill, and believing that the country air will benefit her, they decide to take up residence at Bowes Farm, situated on the Cumberland coast.

However, they soon realise that all they have inherited is trouble. Their uncle had managed to alienate almost everyone in the area and worst of all, was suspected of being a Fenian activist. His reputation leaves Louisa and Eleanor battling to gain acceptance in polite society, especially with Nicholas Maxwell, their handsome neighbour and local magistrate. His father was cheated out of the farm during a card game fifteen years before and he is determined to get the property back.

Louisa unearths secrets from their family’s past that threaten their future while the spectre of their mysterious benefactor overshadows everything. When a Fenian bombing campaign comes close to home, Louisa finds herself a chief suspect and must fight to clear her name. She must dig deep to find the courage to solve the mysteries that Bowes Farm holds before their lives are destroyed. And most importantly of all, will she be able to finally trust and love the man who is surely her sworn enemy?

Author Website

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s