Interview & Giveaway with Author Traci E. Hall



I would like to introduce Author Traci E. Hall.

Traci, please tell us about your book, “The Queen’s Guard.”

The Queen’s Guard: Violet is the first in my medieval romance series about women spies for Queen Eleanor during the crusade. Each woman brings something a little different to the table, and each would willingly lie, cheat, steal or die for Eleanor.


What is the single most powerful challenge when it comes to writing about the past?

Language. I can stay within bounds of what happened, and how they travel and eat etc. but what is always hard for me is how they talk. The truth of the matter is that what is written probably wasn’t how they spoke in casual day to day conversation. I imagine they had slang and contractions too. A lot of words we use weren’t invented yet, either, so I just do the best I can while keeping the story flowing for the modern reader – and add an author’s note explaining what I’ve done, and why.

What is your favorite/least favorite character you have written about and why?

They are all my favorites at the time! Just like a mother can’t have a favorite child, I like all my characters, and want the best for them. During the writing process, they become family, best friends, confidants.

How long did it take you to write The Queen’s Guard?

I am a prolific writer with a supportive family. They understand when the story keeps me in a different room. I plot, and do character sheets so that when I sit down, I really know what is going on. Prep time cuts down at least two months writing for me, and I can then finish my story in three or four months.

Who designed your book cover?

Medallion Press has a wonderful Art department!

Who is your publisher?

Medallion Press. They’ve been really great to work with, and published my Boadicea series. Love’s Magic, Beauty’s Curse and Boadicea’s Legacy

Who or what inspired you to become an author?

I’ve always told stories to myself, or my cousins and little brother. I read to escape. It seemed a good fit!

What advice would you give to an aspiring author?

Never give up. My publishing journey has been filled with ups and downs. If you have a burning desire to write a story, then do it. Find a way to make it happen. Publishing right now is intense and crazy, and a lot of interesting projects have come from the chaos. Don’t be afraid.

What is your favorite quote?

“to write is human, to edit is divine”
― Stephen King, On Writing

Only because I didn’t use to think this, I dreaded revisions ad edits, but really, edits are smoothing the work to a shiny finish, knowing you’ve done your best. Thank you so much Stephanie

Traci


Author Bio & Links:
 

 

Award winning author Traci Hall writes paranormal romances for teens as well as historical romances for adults. She’s co authored a non-fiction book about adoption, and written a coming of age story. Traci has been interviewed on the radio, web tv, and Fox and Friends. She lives in South Florida with her husband and children, reading, researching and writing. tracihallauthor@aol.com www.traciehall.com



Traci is graciously giving a e-book of the Queen’s Guard for a lucky winner. Please leave a comment below and your email address and a winner will be chosen. The giveaway ends on September 4th.

My review for, The Queens’ Guard is here:

http://layeredpages.blogspot.com/2012/08/wednesday-reviews.html

Stephanie

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Review: The Miracle Inspector by Helen Smith

 
 
 
A refreshingly original piece of literature, The Miracle Inspector will spur you to think in new ways. Helen Smith has created a world where women are so marginalized in futuristic London that they cannot leave their homes without full body coverings. Although the setting is in the future, the story is not set so far in the future as to be unbelievable or unrecognizable which only serves to further invest the reader in the journey.

While weaving the separate strands of this story into a cohesive tapestry Smith endears us to the main couple through her descriptions of their everyday lives, thoughts, and dreams. Simultaneously, an understanding of Lucas’s family history evolves among the pages revealing a tumultuous, if slightly scandalous, past. The details of Lucas and Angela’s planned escape from this new London smacks of accounts of refugee outflows from war torn third world countries. It is this rendering of a modern western society reduced to “an oppressive place where poetry has been forced underground, theatres and schools are shut, and women are not allowed to work outside the home” which spurs thoughts on how life could change in an instant if we allow fear to overcome rationality.

Smith has won a well-deserved Arts Council Award for The Miracle Inspector. I would recommend this book to readers looking for an unconventional love story, or those interested in themes about overcoming oppression. Also, for the descriptions of poetry and art, this book would appeal to those with an interested in performing and activist arts.

Brandy Strake
Layered Pages Review Team Member

Interview with Author Mary Louisa Locke

I would like to introduce Mary Louisa Locke, the winner of the B.R.A.G Medallion

Mary, please tell us about your book, Maids of Misfortune.

Maids of Misfortune is the first in a series of historical mysteries and short stories I have written set in Victorian San Francisco. Maids of Misfortune introduces Annie Fuller, a San Francisco widow who owns a boarding house and supplements her income as Madam Sibyl, a clairvoyant, giving business and domestic advice. As the book opens in the summer of 1879, a creditor threatens to take away her home, and one of Madam Sibyl’s clients, Mr. Voss, dies suddenly. Annie Fuller and Nate Dawson, the Voss family lawyer and romantic interest, try to find out the truth about Voss’s death in order to save his family and Annie from financial ruin. In order to do so, Annie goes undercover as a domestic servant in the murdered man’s house. This is a light, romantic, cozy mystery that takes the protagonists from formal parlors to a Charity Ball and a buggy ride through Golden Gate Park to the sea shore, but it also deals with some of the more serious social and economic problems people faced in San Francisco in the late Victorian era.


Was there any research involved for your story? Please explain.

From the beginning, one of my goals in writing, besides providing an entertaining series of mysteries, was to examine the kinds of jobs that women held in the late 19th century. I am fortunate in that I have a dissertation that I researched and wrote for my doctorate in history entitled “‘Like a Machine or an Animal’: Working Women of the Far West at the end of the Nineteenth Century” to fall back on when I need details about my time period or San Francisco. I also have the books I accumulated while writing that dissertation and later when I began to teach U. S. Women’s history as a college professor. However, what I love about writing now is the resources that exist on the internet. Materials that I had had to get through inter-library loan, or go to archives to read in person (1880 San Francisco Chronicle, memoirs and diaries, historical maps, etc) are now often accessible on line. I also love being able to call up Google’s “street view” for modern day San Francisco so I can zip up and down the city’s hills, recreating the terrain of the city in the past.

What is the single most powerful challenge when it comes to writing novels set in the past?

I think the biggest challenge is weaving the historical details so thoroughly into the storyline that it just enhances rather than distracts. People usually read historical fiction because they want to learn about the past, but they also want to be entertained, and too much detail for the sake of demonstrating that the author knows his or her stuff can bring a reader out of the reading experience, which you never want to do.

In addition, readers bring their own ideas about that past to the book, and those ideas don’t always fit the reality of the past. For example, because I am a professional historian who has thoroughly researched my subject, I know that women like Annie Fuller existed, widows who worked as clairvoyants, women who chafed against the constraints of Victorian gender roles. Yet someone who believes that Annie’s ideas are “too modern” and therefore historically inaccurate is going to be taken out of that story, whether they are correct in their notions or not. In my second book in the series, Uneasy Spirits, I actually included chapter quotes from ads for mediums and clairvoyants from the 1880 San Francisco Chronicle as a subtle way of reassuring readers that my fictional character was grounded in real fact.

One of the ways I have tried to handle these problems is also to develop a series of posts to my blog that provide historical details about the people and places found in my books. This way a reader who wants to know more about places like Golden Gate Park in the 1870s, or the economic and social structure of the city, or the relationship between the Irish immigrant and Halloween as an American holiday can do so in my Victorian San Francisco posts.


Have you ever read or seen yourself as a character in a book?

I think that in terms of basic personality, my protagonist, Annie Fuller, reflects my sense of self. Obviously our life histories are completely different, but out general outlook in life is similar. What I find amusing is that when I conceived of the plot for Maids of Misfortune (while working on my dissertation), I was just a few years older than my protagonist, but when I completed the book, so much time had passed that I was now older than Mrs. O’Rourke, Annie’s cook and housekeeper, who I had thought of as quite old when I first created her.

How long did it take you to write Maids of Misfortune?

I wrote the first draft in 1989 in a brief period between teaching jobs, but then I got a very demanding full-time position teaching at a community college, and, except for occasional rewrites, it lay unpublished for 20 years. Once I had semi-retired in 2009, I did a final rewrite and self-published the book as a paperback and an ebook. At the time I just wanted to give the story I had lived with so long a chance to be read beyond my close circle of friends. Since then I have sold over 40,000 copies of the book, making enough income to retire completely and write full-time, a level of success I never expected.

Who designed your book cover?

Michelle Huffaker, who is a personal friend and a graphic designer. She has designed the covers for both of my novels and my two short stories. I loved working with her because I had a very distinct vision for my covers. I wanted authentic Victorian wallpaper as the background and 19th century illustrations for the centerpieces. Michelle gave me exactly what I wanted.

What is your next book project?

I am working on the third book of the Victorian San Francisco Mystery series, entitled Bloody Lessons. Maids of Misfortune featured domestic service, probably the most prevalent occupation for women in the 19th century, Uneasy Spirits featured Spiritualists, one of the most exotic occupations, and Bloody Lessons will feature teaching, one of the few white-collar professions open to women of the period.

What advice would you give to an aspiring author?

My main advice is to write the stories you would want to read because you are going to have to live with the world and characters you create for a long time and because if you don’t care about your characters it is a good bet that your readers won’t either.

Second, read. Read in the genre you want to write in, and out of it. Read books about writing and the writer’s life, read blogs about the publishing industry so that you can make informed decisions about your career. There never have been so many options available to writers before, and the business of publishing is changing so rapidly that you need to keep up. If I hadn’t done my research, read the blogs of people like J.A. Konrath, or followed the self-publishing website Publetariat.com, I would never have taken the plunge to be a self-published author.

Third, make sure you develop a team of people (and if possible they should include other professional writers-perhaps as part of a writers group) who will be willing to read your work and comment on it honestly as you begin the process of rewriting and editing. Whether you are planning on submitting to an agent or editor to go the traditional publishing route or you are planning to self-publish, your work is going to have to be a mature and polished as it can if it is going to bring you success.

What is your favorite quote?


”Beware the Jabberwock, my son!
 The jaws that bite, the claws that catch!
 Beware the Jubjub bird, and shun
 The frumious Bandersnatch!” Lewis Carroll, Through the Looking-Glass, 1872.

You asked, and this is what immediately sprang to mind!


Author Bio:

M. Louisa Locke is a retired professor of U.S. and Women’s History, who has embarked on a second career as an historical fiction writer. The first two published books in her series of historical mysteries set in Victorian San Francisco, Maids of Misfortune and Uneasy Spirits,feature Annie Fuller, a boardinghouse owner and clairvoyant, and Nate Dawson, a San Francisco lawyer, who together investigate murders and other crimes, while her short stories, Dandy Detects and The Miss Moffets Mend a Marriage, give secondary characters from this series a chance to get involved in their own minor mysteries. Dr. Locke is currently living in San Diego, where she is working on Bloody Lessons, the next full-length installment of her Annie Fuller/Nate Dawson series. For more about M. Louisa Locke and her work, see http://mlouisalocke.com/or follow her on twitter and facebook.

Maids of Misfortune is free on the Kindle today and tomorrow, August 20 &21.


We are delighted that Stephanie has chosen to interview Mary Louisa Locke who is the author of Maids of Misfortune, one of our medallion honorees at http://www.bragmedallion.com. To be awarded a B.R.A.G. MedallionTM, a book must receive unanimous approval by a group of our readers. It is a daunting hurdle and it serves to reaffirm that a book such as Maids of Misfortune merits the investment of a reader’s time and money.


IndieBRAG


Thank you!
Stephanie





Interview with Author Sarah Bower

What a honor it is to interview Author Sarah Bower. Sarah is an International Best Selling Author of, The Needle in the Blood & The Sins of the House of Borgia.
Sarah, I really enjoyed reading your novel, The Needle in the Blood. Could you please tell us a little about your book and what interested you the most about this story?

I’m glad you enjoyed reading NEEDLE, Stephanie, and thanks again for the lovely review you posted on Layered Pages. As I’ve written elsewhere, the Bayeux Tapestry is something we take very much for granted in the UK. It’s like the wallpaper to our history, if you like. What originally made me sit up and take notice of it in a different way was a TV show hosted by Simon Schama, in which he described one famous image in the Tapestry, of a woman and child fleeing a burning house, as being the first image in western art of what war does to civilians. That was the starting point for my novel. It then began to take more concrete form when I discovered that, although very little is known for certain about the Tapestry (making it fertile ground for the fiction writer!), current thinking suggests it was made in England, by English embroiderers, but for a Norman patron. It seemed to me that this created interesting tensions for me to explore.


Were there any challenges in researching for your novel?

I studied medieval history at university, so the historical research wasn’t quite so much of a challenge as finding out about the mechanics of how the Tapestry was made. I can scarcely sew on a button, so learning about medieval embroidery (because Tapestry is a misnomer – the work is, in fact, an embroidery) was a steep learning curve for me! That said, researching the life of Odo was also problematic because he is quite a shadowy figure in history despite his high profile at the time of the Norman Conquest. There are no full-length biographies of him, and little of his correspondence survives, just one or two letters between him and Archbishop Lanfranc. We don’t even know for sure when he was born or where he grew up. In another way, however, this made him a perfect protagonist for the novel because it enabled me to invent far more freely than if he had been a better documented historical figure.



Were there any scenes you found more difficult to write than others?

Oh, the sex scenes! They are always the hardest for me. I recently heard an interview with John Banville, in which he described the difficulty of writing sex scenes as being the bridging of the gap between noble sentiments and absurd actions. I don’t think I could put it better myself. I’m relieved, and flattered, that readers have, on the whole, been kind about this aspect of the novel because, with a hero and heroine like Odo and Gytha, sex was clearly going to play a central role in their relationship, even though I struggled, at first, to force them into a more abstemious mould. On average, I think each sex scene took me about two weeks to write – and that was just the first draft! I guess they take about two minutes to read. Nor do I find that aspect of writing gets any easier with practice.


Did writing this story teach you anything and what is it?

Although published after SINS OF THE HOUSE OF BORGIA in the US, NEEDLE is my first novel, and in that respect, it taught me a lot about the need for resilience, patience and self-belief if you are to complete a novel successfully, and then find a publisher for it. I had no idea how tough both these things are until I embarked on the process!

Regarding the specific subject matter of this book, it served to remind me that we have been a multicultural society here in the UK for well over a thousand years. If only more medieval history was taught in our schools, perhaps people would be less anxious about and more welcoming of those who still come here from all the different corners of the world and contribute so much to making us who we are. That is one reason why I chose to write the book in a way which tries to be even-handed to both conquered and conquerors, acknowledging that both sides were traumatised by the experience, and both have contributed hugely to our language, culture, law, politics and social structure.


Who designed the book cover?

The US edition cover was designed in-house, I believe, by my publishers. I think it’s gorgeous and am absolutely delighted with it.


Who is your publisher?

Sourcebooks Landmark, who also published SINS OF THE HOUSE OF BORGIA.


What do you consider the most challenging about writing a novel or about writing in general?

As I have indicated in an earlier reply, I think the biggest challenge of writing a novel is the time it takes. Each of my novels has taken me, on average, three years to complete, from beginning the background reading and planning to having a final draft I think is good enough to be shared with readers. This knowledge makes getting started quite a difficult and nerve-wracking experience. I do rather envy writers I know who can complete a book in months rather than years. I’m afraid I rarely write in the white heat of inspiration but creep along at a snail’s pace, groping in the dark and hoping I find the right way. A tutor on my creative writing MA course once said, ‘Only write a novel if everything else fails,’ a sentiment with which I am in total accord! Writing novels is incredibly difficult. On the other hand, there is great reward and excitement to be had from engaging with readers who always find things in your work you didn’t know were there and thus give your book a kind of life of its own which is so much more than you can give it yourself as the author.

Have you ever had writer’s block? If so, what do you do about it?

I’m not sure I really believe in writer’s block. Writing is my job. Do lawyers or nurses or refuse collectors get blocked? No. So why should professional writers be any different? Of course, it’s not always easy to gear oneself up for the imaginative effort involved in novel writing, but if that’s the case, I generally find I have some other kind of writing to do, or writing-related work such as teaching and mentoring other writers. For the imaginative work, I do think one has to be attuned to one’s emotional and mental state, even one’s physical health, in order to be prepared for the obstacles these things can throw up. One has to be aware that on a good day one might write a thousand words or more, but on a less good day it might be just a sentence.
That said, I know some writers do experience blocks in a very real sense, so perhaps I’ve just been lucky so far!

What is your next book project?

I have a contemporary thriller in the pipeline, and have just begun work on a companion piece to it. Although the new book will be more of a love story than a thriller, they have in common the fact that both are about people whose identity is different to the one they were born with and how this affects their lives. Both are also set on the east coast of England, the new one near Whitby, where Dracula landed of course!

What advice would you give to an aspiring author?

Well, if everything has failed and you find you have no option, you need patience, resilience and bloody-mindedness if you are going to keep going and succeed. You also need to be able to divide yourself into the writer, working in private, possibly not washing or even getting dressed for days, and the public persona who has to get out there, don the killer heels and lipstick, and sell her wares. In this regard, I find it helps to think of myself as a small marketing company set up to sell the novels of Sarah Bower. That way I can put some psychological distance between myself as writer and myself as a public figure. The business side of writing is assuming more and more importance for most of us as the publishing industry fragments and fewer and fewer novelists can expect to be published via the traditional route, by a big publishing house with a team of editors and marketing staff to put behind the book. We are increasingly having to become our own editors, proof readers and salespeople.

What is your favourite quote?

Oh dear, this is a difficult one, there are so many good ones and I have so many different favourites. So let’s go with the quote from Olive Schreiner’sFrom Man to Man which I use as an epigraph to THE NEEDLE IN THE BLOOD: ‘Has the pen or pencil dipped so deep in the blood of the human race as the needle?’

Bio:

Sarah Bower is a prize-winning novelist and short story writer. She is a regular contributor to the Historical Novels Reviewhistoricalnovelsociety.org/magazines/ , Ink, Sweat and Tearswww.inksweatandtears.co.uk/, andWords With Jamwww.wordswithjam.co.uk/. She works as a mentor to other writers, and teaches creative writing at the University of East Anglia, the Open University and the Unthank School of Writing. She holds an MA in creative writing from the University of East Anglia where she is now based in her role as co-ordinator of the mentorship scheme for literary translators run by the British Centre for Literary Translation.

Sarah is the author of THE NEEDLE IN THE BLOOD and SINS OF THE HOUSE OF BORGIA (originally published in the UK as THE BOOK OF LOVE) Her work has been published in eight countries. She lives in Suffolk, in Eastern England.

Sarah tweets @SarahBower and you also may find her on Facebook.

Thank you Sarah for the pleasure of an interview! It was an honor! 

Stephanie


Thank you, Stephanie, for asking me. It’s been a pleasure to answer your questions.

Sarah





Wednesday Book Reviews

The Queen’s Pleasure by Brandy Purdy
Brandy Purdy writes a story about Robert Dudley who meets Amy Robsart-a daughter of a squire-and falls in love with her. Despite his family’s misgivings of the match he soon marries her. Not long after, Robert’s love for Amy fades and he wants to return to court. When Elizabeth becomes Queen of England, Robert’s ambition grows and so does his resentment towards his marriage to Amy. Roberts’s loyalties seem to move to whoever is in power at the moment and throughout the story he shows no quilt or remorse for his actions. When Amy turns up dead, suspicion falls on Dudley and people question whether the Queen was involved.

This story focuses on Robert’s wife, Amy & Queen Elizabeth’s point of view. Even though Roberts view is lacking, Purdy writes in great detail of Roberts emotional, physical and mental abuse to Amy and his constant demands of Elizabeth. Robert completely disgusted me and what sadden me the most was that he left Amy shut up in various manners across the countryside for long periods of time-alone- not caring for her well-being while he was at court living the royal life and misleading Elizabeth about his relationship he has with his wife.

The lack of dialog in the beginning of the story made it difficult to read and I felt parts of it was getting a little repetitive and could have been shortened. However, Purdy does a superb job exploring the mind of an abused wife.

In-spite of already knowing about Amy’s mysterious death, it wasn’t any easier reading about it again. The circumstances surrounding her death is still a mystery and we know very little about Amy and her marriage to Robert. Purdy gives us a clear and painful perspective of how it could have been for her. I applaud Purdy for strong character building and even though I was mentally exhausted after reading this story… it was a gripping & emotional read. I recommend this story to readers who enjoy reading about the Tudors and wanting to explore more of Amy’s life.

3.5 Stars

Stephanie

What She Knew by K.R. Hughes
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Wow! Just wow! What She Knew by K.R. Hughes and T.L. Burns has left me speechless and wanting more! What She Knew is a story that based on what would happen if on that fateful night in August of 1962 if Marilyn would have lived. There are so many famous names in this book from the entire Kennedy family to Frank Sinatra and the rat pack. K.R. Hughes and T.L. Burns do an excellent job of spinning a story and keeping the reader in suspense while they read about all of these famous characters. The reader will really feel as if they have stepped into the middle of the Camelot. The story will keep you guessing right until the very end…right until the day of November 22, 1963.

I was excited to receive this book to review, I am such a big Marilyn Monroe girl and any book that I could read about her I do. This story was written based entirely off of a “What if” question and boy does it pull every conspiracy theory over the night the Marilyn Monroe died, how she died, and why she died into light. It was no secret that she had an affair with president and it was no secret that many different people wanted her out of the way but why? What did she know that made her such a liability? K.R. Hughes and T.L Burns had created a story that leaves the reader wondering just how much of what they have written is true or how much of it is make believe.

I give this book 4.5 stars!
Rachel Massaro

Interview with Author Nan Hawthorne

I would like to introduce Author Nan Hawthorne, the winner of the B.R.A.G Medallion. If you have any enquiries about IndieBRAG and you are a self-publishing author please visit our website at www.bragmedallion.com

Nan thank you for the pleasure of this interview. You write about a period of time in our history that I’m fascinated with and would like to know more about. Please tell us about your book, An Involuntary King: A Tale of Anglo Saxon England.

An Involuntary King: A Tale of Anglo Saxon England had an unusual beginning.  The year was 1964 and the place the Southeast Alaska Methodist Youth Camp far “out the road” from the capital, Juneau.  I was twelve.  I met a girl named Laura Burr who was a year younger.  We started playing “Indian princess” with her as the princess and me as an Indian brave, the story quickly changing to something more to our liking, the queen and king of a mythic kingdom.    We got into it, held a wedding and wedding supper, then had to figure out how we would continue “The Story” as we came to call it once she had gone home to her town and I to mine.  It started out as letters between the royal couple, but after a couple years we realized these two needed to be where they need not have such a long distance relationship and started to write stories about them and many other characters we created.  We kept at this for a few years.

About 35 years later I started a storytelling group called Ghost letters and while trying to decide what historical or fictional character to play on it, m y husband suggested I resurrect the characters from “The Story”.  The stories and letters I now wrote were fun and showed me I could write fiction.  So I started putting the pieces together.  In the final draft I had a very grown up novel of love and betrayal, battle and friendship in an imaginary late 8th century Anglo Saxon kingdom, in the area and at about the time that the Vikings would soon start raids.

The 8th century was such a long time ago in our history. Were there any challenges you faced while researching for your book?

My first challenge was that Laura and I had pretty much created a generic medieval world based around castles and knights on horseback.  I had chosen as a teen to set the stories in a period before, I thought, much was known of England, the 8th century.  The first thing I learned when writing the book seriously was that there were no castles, no knights, nothing resembling the image of Arthur’s Britain.  I actually had to start over and change situations and settings to match the era I had now set the stories in.  I wound up adoring the Anglo Saxon period, so, as they say, it’s all good.

The second challenge was how to write realistic battle scenes.  I eventually discovered Bernard Cornwell’s work on just these needs, but in the meantime I put out a call in the Society for Creative Anachronism for someone who would help me “choreograph” Anglo Saxon battles.  That’s how I made the acquaintance of Jack graham, a high school teacher with whom I now have a mutual admiration society.  He tells me tactics for battles and I turn them into prose.  He is still with me, sad that my upcoming fourth novel has no battle in it.

I am severely visually impaired so cannot simply go to the library and do research the way most people can.  So I have relied heavily on the Internet, which, thanks to my own assistive technology, is about as accessible as a medium can be.  In the four years since An Involuntary King was published, the Amazon Kindle keyboard has come along with its text to speech feature and suddenly more books and other materials than I could ever have imagined are in a format I can read!

What is the most surprising thing you learned about Anglo Saxon England?

Besides the quite different architecture and battle I mentioned above, I discovered that in Anglo Saxon England women had more rights than they would have again until at least the 19th century.  They had marriage rights, property rights, and a lot of other opportunities we would recognize now.  They could also be warriors, as numerous burial finds of women buried in armor prove.  The Norman Invasion in 1066 is what brought the change, bring feudalism, more influence by the Roman Catholic Church than the original Celtic influence in Britain, and a complete dissolution of women’s status in all classes.

What interests you most in Historical Fiction?

First of all, history is usually itself fiction.  All we really know is what we find in the written record along with archaeological data.  Same sex desiring people, for instance, seem nonexistent or negatively portrayed in the Middle Ages because the only official records are arrest and punishment.  Whole populations were ignored or misrepresented, so you often have to read between the lines to come up with what might be taken as genuine facts.

Historical fiction, when it is done responsibly and accurately, brings a human face and heart to history.  A historical novelist can use his or her knowledge of human nature to extrapolate what life m ay have been like during, say, a great even in history.  One of my favorite examples of this is Anel Viz’s novel, The Memoirs of Col. Gerard Vreilhac.  In one section Gerard is a young man living in Paris during the evolution of 1789.  We all know about the storming of the Bastille. But do we know what it might have been like to live a few blocks away during the event, how one would find out about it, how one might react, how one’s daily life would change in the coming weeks, months and years.  To explore this you need the leeway afforded by fiction.  Otherwise all you have is dry facts.

What is your favourite time in History?

That is changing, but I think it always will be the Middle Ages.  My second novel takes place during the Crusade of 1101.  I plan under a pen name to write a series of novels that take place in the late 10th century in England, back with my beloved Anglo Saxons.  My alter ego, Christopher Moss, just finished an American Civil War era novel, however, so clearly I am broadening my interest.

What is your next book project?

An Involuntary King came out in 2008 and had a lovely reception, and now this honor from B.R.A.G.!  My next novel was Beloved Pilgrim; the story of a young woman who adopts her late twin brother’s identity to fight in what was the most influential of all the crusades and the most devastating.  It came out in 2011.  The book I just finished under my pen name is a gay love story that takes place on a Mississippi riverboat and in New Orleans before and during the 1860s.  I want to turn that into a mystery series later on and do the same with my next book, the first of a series called Wintanceaster Hauntings, paranormal mysteries set in 985 AD in Winchester, England.

What books have most influenced your life?

My life or my writing?  They probably are the same, actually.  I was very into Robin Hood as a young girl, and this led me into an interest in the Middle Ages.  I read Roger Lancelyn Greene’s King Arthur and the Knight of the Round Table.  I also fell in love with Ireland thanks to the movie the Fighting Prince of Donegal and the book The Proud Man by Elizabeth Linigton.  More recently I have become an avid fan of Bernard Cornwell’s novels, all of them, and in the area of GLBT fiction I admire Josh Lanyon greatly.

What do you think contributes to making a writer successful in self-publishing?

One has to look at the advantages having a commercial publisher offers, which is getting less and less, and make sure your book has those advantages from another source.  You need to write a terrific book, but you also need to get it edited, including everything from getting advice as you write and simple proofreading.  A professional cover will be vital even for ebooks.  And you will have to do your own marketing.  You would anyway.  To do your own marketing you need to get inside the head of your ideal reader and figure out how to reach them.  Since you probably won’t be on any bookshelves, you have to learn to use the Internet wisely and well.  This came more or less naturally to me, but it may be harder for others.

What advice would you give to an aspiring author?

Write, write, write.  Listen to your own judgment and don’t bother with writing classes.  So many of them will ultimately stifle your own creativity and style.  Realize that editing and reediting will take more time than writing the novel.  When you are not writing, read, read, read.    When the time comes to sell books, do favors.  That’s my particular secret.  I naturally help others.  I just plain like to.  But some years ago I discovered there is a return benefit. People like to help people who helped them.  Finally, strive for historical accuracy but remember two things: we don’t really know what happened in the past, and the first priority of a novelist is to tell a jolly good story.  You can always include a historical note saying what you changed… like Bernard Cornwell does.

What do you as a writer, get from writing novels that means the most to you?

Friends.  Every time I start a new novel I know that by the time it is finished I will have a whole new bunch of imaginary friends.  After all, I always say that the best thing about my profession is that I get to live in a dream world for a living.

What is your favourite quote?
Monique Wittig: “There was a time when you were not a slave, remember that. You walked alone, full of laughter, you bathed bare-bellied. You say you have lost all recollection of it, remember . . . You say there are no words to describe this time, you say it does not exist. But remember. Make an effort to remember. Or, failing that, invent.”

Author Bio and Links:

Nan Hawthorne is a historical novelist who lives in the beautiful Pacific Northwest with her husband and doted-upon cats.  She has been in love with history and historical fiction since, at four, she discovered the Richard Greene “The Adventures of Robin Hood” television series.  She wrote her first short story at seven, then launched into the letters and stories with a teen friend that ultimately became her first novel, AN INVOLUNTARY KING: A TALE OF ANGLE SAXON ENGLAND (2008).  The author of one nonfiction work on women and body image, she now concentrates primarily on historical novels set in the Middle Ages.  Her latest novel, BELOVED PILGRIM, looks at gender identity and self-realization during the chaotic and doomed Crusade of 1101.  She writes several blogs on historical themes, owns the medieval-novels.com catalog and also Internet radio station, Radio Dé Danann.

Nan Hawthorne’s website: http://www.nanhawthorne.com

We are delighted that Stephanie has chosen to interview Nan Hawthorne who is the author of An Involuntary King: A Tale of Anglo Saxon England, one of our medallion honorees at http://www.bragmedallion.com. To be awarded a B.R.A.G. MedallionTM, a book must receive unanimous approval by a group of our readers. It is a daunting hurdle and it serves to reaffirm that a book such as An Involuntary King: A Tale of Anglo Saxon England merits the investment of a reader’s time and money.

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Thank you!
Stephanie






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