Book Wish-List: Visible Mending

From what little I’ve read so far on the subject of Visible Mending AKA Sashiko Stitching is that it is traced back to the Edo era of Japan. The translation for Sashiko is “little stabs” refers to running stitch through fabric that is visible to the eye. One would find these visible mending on clothing of Japanese working people. This method of stitching extends the life of the clothing…

Furthermore, in my opinion shows an appreciation for the value of fabrics and the respect for resources that go into making the clothes. To take value of what one has no matter the quantity. Sashiko is important and I hope it continues to grow in awareness, is learned by many more people and will never be forgotten. Today you will find many different patterns of Sashiko and as the trend grows you become educated on how important it is to up-cycle your clothes for various reason which I will share in another post. Today I’m sharing three books that I have added to my wish-list and hope to acquire them soon to better educate myself in the art of visible mending, to educate consumers and the for my own preservation projects.

Side note: The Edo era of Japan is the period between 1603 and 1868.

Stephanie Hopkins

Mending Matters“Mending Matters explores sewing on two levels: First, it includes more than 20 hands-on projects that showcase current trends in visible mending that are edgy, modern, and bold—but draw on traditional stitching. It does all this through just four very simple mending techniques: exterior patches, interior patches, slow stitches, darning, and weaving. In addition, the book addresses the way mending leads to a more mindful relationship to fashion and to overall well-being. In essays that accompany each how-to chapter, Katrina Rodabaugh explores mending as a metaphor for appreciating our own naturally flawed selves, and she examines the ways in which mending teaches us new skills, self-reliance, and confidence, all gained from making things with our own hands.”

 

Slow Stitch“Sometimes less is more—and quality is more important than quantity. That’s true in textile art too, and this much-needed guide brings a meaningful, thoughtful, and sustainable approach to stitchery. See how to slow down and experience more joy in your craft by trying simple techniques based on traditional practice, reusing and reinventing materials, and limiting equipment. Richly illustrated throughout, this inspirational book will connect with those who seek a new way of working—whether it’s starting a stitch journal or joining a community of like-minded artists.”

 

Ultimate Sashiko Sourcebook“Sashiko, the traditional Japaneses technique of needlework quilting, uses simple running stitch to create beautifully decorative patterns ideal for patchwork, quilting and embroidery. Sashiko (pronounced shash-ko) means ‘stab stitch’ and refers to the small running stitch that is worked to build up distinctive decorative patterns, of which there are hundreds. The book begins by exploring the origins of the technique to strengthen clothes and to make them warmer. Getting Started describes everything you need to begin stitching, including selecting suitable fabrics and threads, marking out patterns on the fabric, as well as the stitching technique itself. Ten project chapters show how easy it is to use sashiko patterns to make beautiful items for the home. The sashiko patterns are described in step-by-step detail in the pattern library, showing you exactly how to achieve each individual pattern with ease. Finally a gallery of work by contemporary Japanese textile artists provides extra inspiration.”

1 thought on “Book Wish-List: Visible Mending

  1. Pingback: Stitch Mindspace: Knit Stitch/Embroidery Books | Layered Pages

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s