Better Late Than Never

I meant to post this blog post live earlier but better late than never. Yesterday was full of good coffee, great friends, binge watching my one of my favorite YouTube Channels-while working- and crafty adventures.

A few of my friends wanted to see more patch designs I’m creating with my Grandmother’s quilting scraps for my denim rag quilt. Here are a few samples of what I’m creating:

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Also I am making the quilt bigger so tonight I’m cutting my denim squares. There will be a lot of sewing involved but I’m excited about it. This project is being done when I have down time which isn’t often. I was able to cut out three rows worth of squares last-night.

After I completed my tasks of denim cutting,  I started a rag rug with my denim scraps from my denim rag quilt-currently making-and old t-shirts. What I have so far is the start of the center part of the rug. Don’t worry, I will make the circle tighter to close that gap hole in the middle. These rugs are so easy to make. You just braid your fabric together and I’ll show you soon how you can attach it all together. There are two methods to sewing this rug. I’m going to sew by hand. I tied the end with a hair tie to pick up where I left off at a later time. More to come!

I met my local Poshmark Tribe Copper Coin (400 Chambers St, Woodstock, GA 30188, USA) yesterday morning for the Poshmark 8th Birthday celebration and gift exchange. What a blast we had! Our Posh community in Atlanta is the best! I am going to another one on Saturday so I will be blogging more about this and sharing  pictures on Monday.

posh turns 8

Other related content:

Book Wish-List: Visible Mending

Projects Galore

Denim Quilting On The Cheap

Poshmark Closet

Follow my closet @artsycouture42 and use my code: ARTSYCOUTURE42 to get a free $10 credit when signing up for Poshmark! www.poshmark.

Book Wish-List: Visible Mending

From what little I’ve read so far on the subject of Visible Mending AKA Sashiko Stitching is that it is traced back to the Edo era of Japan. The translation for Sashiko is “little stabs” refers to running stitch through fabric that is visible to the eye. One would find these visible mending on clothing of Japanese working people. This method of stitching extends the life of the clothing…

Furthermore, in my opinion shows an appreciation for the value of fabrics and the respect for resources that go into making the clothes. To take value of what one has no matter the quantity. Sashiko is important and I hope it continues to grow in awareness, is learned by many more people and will never be forgotten. Today you will find many different patterns of Sashiko and as the trend grows you become educated on how important it is to up-cycle your clothes for various reason which I will share in another post. Today I’m sharing three books that I have added to my wish-list and hope to acquire them soon to better educate myself in the art of visible mending, to educate consumers and the for my own preservation projects.

Side note: The Edo era of Japan is the period between 1603 and 1868.

Stephanie Hopkins

Mending Matters“Mending Matters explores sewing on two levels: First, it includes more than 20 hands-on projects that showcase current trends in visible mending that are edgy, modern, and bold—but draw on traditional stitching. It does all this through just four very simple mending techniques: exterior patches, interior patches, slow stitches, darning, and weaving. In addition, the book addresses the way mending leads to a more mindful relationship to fashion and to overall well-being. In essays that accompany each how-to chapter, Katrina Rodabaugh explores mending as a metaphor for appreciating our own naturally flawed selves, and she examines the ways in which mending teaches us new skills, self-reliance, and confidence, all gained from making things with our own hands.”

 

Slow Stitch“Sometimes less is more—and quality is more important than quantity. That’s true in textile art too, and this much-needed guide brings a meaningful, thoughtful, and sustainable approach to stitchery. See how to slow down and experience more joy in your craft by trying simple techniques based on traditional practice, reusing and reinventing materials, and limiting equipment. Richly illustrated throughout, this inspirational book will connect with those who seek a new way of working—whether it’s starting a stitch journal or joining a community of like-minded artists.”

 

Ultimate Sashiko Sourcebook“Sashiko, the traditional Japaneses technique of needlework quilting, uses simple running stitch to create beautifully decorative patterns ideal for patchwork, quilting and embroidery. Sashiko (pronounced shash-ko) means ‘stab stitch’ and refers to the small running stitch that is worked to build up distinctive decorative patterns, of which there are hundreds. The book begins by exploring the origins of the technique to strengthen clothes and to make them warmer. Getting Started describes everything you need to begin stitching, including selecting suitable fabrics and threads, marking out patterns on the fabric, as well as the stitching technique itself. Ten project chapters show how easy it is to use sashiko patterns to make beautiful items for the home. The sashiko patterns are described in step-by-step detail in the pattern library, showing you exactly how to achieve each individual pattern with ease. Finally a gallery of work by contemporary Japanese textile artists provides extra inspiration.”

Denim Quilting On The Cheap

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In a recent post I talked about the many projects I’m working on and I talked a little about a Denim Rag Quilting project I’ve started. Since I’m doing this on my free time I have almost finished cutting out the squares/blocks. You don’t need a fancy template (Square Ruler) for measuring your squares when making a Denim Rag Quilt. I used an old cardboard box lid I cut 8×8 (shown in the picture). I did not use a fabric pen but a regular pin I had on my desk. I turned the jeans inside out to trace my squares. If you don’t have a Quilting Rotary Cutter, that’s okay. You don’t need it for this project unless you want the process to be quicker. Though it didn’t take much time to cut out the squares and I’m a bit crafty so I enjoyed using the scissors. Also, I did not use a Self Healing Cutting mat for cutting. I measured and cut out all the squares on my bed while watching TV. The size of the Quilt will be 49W/60L and that equals to 6 squares per row, 7 rows which comes to 42 Squares in total. Depending on the size of the jeans you can get about 6 squares per leg from a pair of jeans. This Quilt is basically going to be the size of a Throw Blanket. Be sure to save your denim scraps for other projects!

I was thinking about using some of my vintage fabric style scraps I use for mix media projects but I decided to do some patch squares on some of the denim blocks using my Grandmother’s scraps. I inherited a lot of her quilting supply and her sewing machine when she went to be with the Lord a few years ago. So this quilt with be dear to my heart and this is my way of honoring her love of quilting.

You really can make denim rag quilts on a budget and with what you have on hand without spending a lot of money. So go grab a few pairs of old jeans and get started! I’ll continue to share my process with you all! These quilts are a lot of fun to make.

Blessings