Accessible Art: Free Form Medium

This weekend I pretty much stayed in bed nursing a broken small toe while working on a few art projects. Friday night, I hand sewed little patchwork collages to send to my friend for her art projects. My toe, foot and leg were in utter agony so I needed the distraction. When it broke, the toe literally went completely sideways and I had to put it back in place, then wrap it up. I couldn’t walk so I hand stitch and watch YouTube for the rest of the evening trying to forget the pain. I also worked on my textile art journal. The journal is made with 100% fabrics (mostly up-cycle material) and completely handed stitched. Each page is a pouch to hold mini patchwork collages that I’m making and a few pieces of paper with journaling about my art journey for 2020. I won’t share those until the end of the year.

For two decades or so…ahem, I’m not revealing my age, I collected store bought pattern paper. While I have fun using them, I didn’t feel challenged and I wanted to create my own designs for my art projects. Creative license and originality are important to me. I adore creating my own patterns and experimenting with new mediums. There’s a story there but I’m getting off track…Anyhow, this is one of the pieces I made on Sunday and she’s too pretty to cut into for my collage projects! I’m calling her, “Coral Rose.” I believe she will be happy in a shadow box.

Coral Rose

While I do use store bought pattern paper packs when they are on sale, I also make my own pattern paper and backgrounds. If you are on a tight budget, I recommend making your own pattern paper. It’s so easy! You can even use copy paper as your base.

For the picture below,  I wanted to make an abstract landscape for my inspirational journal. I do have a pad of mixed media paper so I used that. Then I gathered distressed crayons that are water-reactive and baby wipes. If you don’t have the distress crayons, you can use color pencils. I basically doodled/scribbled the colors then took baby wipes to blend the colors. It’s a lot of fun to play with these mediums.

Lanscape for scraps

 

Anyone can do it. You can even create these and tear them into strips to apply as texture for your journaling collages. For any mixed media project really. Free-form. Play. Relax. Enjoy.

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In the pictures below are squares I cut from a doodling page I made to use on my future collages. They don’t look like much now but when I apply with other mediums they will turn out great!

 

Baby WipesBy the way…if you use baby wipes (which I highly recommend using) please save them for your other art projects! They make amazing texture! I buy mine at the dollar store and I make sure they have as little chemicals added as possible.

 

 

 

 

Two pagesThese are two pages made from paper I used to put under other paper I was staining, painting to collect the splatters. The base page is from a mixed media paper pad I bought on sale years ago.

 

 

 

I don’t like to waste my paint or paper. They make for great scraps for your mixed media projects. I cut them up and applied them in an abstract pattern. I still have some of it left over so I will use it for another project. I love how these two pages turned out and can’t wait to journal with them.

scrap paper used for two pages

Other materials used for this project. Also, I will be applying clear gesso over the pages to seal them. If you don’t have gesso, you can use a gel medium or mod podge.

 

Here are a few more pieces I created this week and I will use them for various projects. As you can see, you can accomplish a lot from when you are laid up with a hurt foot! Ha! -Stephanie

 

Layered Pages: This & That

Last night I had trouble getting to sleep so I decided to get my art on by up-cycling scraps from my mixed media stash. Yesterday, I posted a list of items you can use around your home to create with without breaking the bank. Below are more items to add to that list I thought of last night. These items are fantastic for adding texture and adding to your paste.

Never say you’re not talented and can’t create something. Just play. Creating free-form is beautiful and you’ll never know until you try. You learn something by doing… -Stephanie

nightly Art Final

I will be adding slow stitch through this collage for the finishing touches.

 

 

Idea List of materials for your creations:

  1. Baby Powder
  2. Tea leaves
  3. Tea Bags
  4. Parsley
  5. Oatmeal

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Layered Pages: Creating With Cloth

MeI’ve always loved creating with cloth. There is something soothing about the feel of fabrics, slowly guiding needle through cloth, and layering pieces to create new textures and designs. Working with paper, drawing and painting has the same effect. Creating is my safe space. A time of rest, reflection and recovery-if you will. The act slows your mind down and brings you to present in this fast paced world we live in.

I love books and seeing what others are creating and this year I’m cataloging books in the mixed-media subject at Layered Pages. My wish is for you to be inspired and to find your peace through creating with your hands. There is deep satisfaction in hand work. -Stephanie Hopkins

The Textile ArtistThe Textile Artist: Layered Cloth by Ann Small

Ann Small’s imaginative use of cutting and manipulating techniques, and her layering and colouring tricks, makes this your ‘go-to’ guide for bringing form and texture to your fabric artwork. This book is a rich resource and reference for textile artists seeking new ideas and who want to experiment with reverse appliqué and related techniques such as layering, trapunto, stacks, puffs and fabric manipulation.

Packed with techniques suitable for quilting and other textile art

Three wearable step-by-step projects

Clear, close-up images make layering enjoyable and accessible.

Landscapes in Textile Mixed Media Painting on ClothLandscapes in Textile Mixed Media: Painting on Cloth by Cas Holmes

Combine the textural quality of stitchwork and the spontaneity of paint with this practical, beautiful guide to landscapes in mixed-media textile art. 
Renowned author Cas Holmes brings together the world of the stitcher and that of the painter as she demonstrates her technique known as “stitch-sketching” and shows how to develop your approach to textile art. Focusing on the common language between the two forms, she begins with basic advice on keeping a sketchbook, stitching on paper and fabric, and working digitally. Cas then looks at both urban and intimate spaces, capturing the changing seasons, the technical aspects of painting and dying cloth, experimenting with photos, creating stitchscapes, attaining inspiration from found objects, and so much more.

Stitched TextilesStitched Textiles: Nature by Stephanie Redfern

An inspiring step-by-step guide to creating contemporary textile artworks themed on nature.

Stitched Textiles: The Natural World is the fourth title in this successful theme-based series. It contains an extensive section on techniques, featuring step-by-step guides to machine- and hand-stitching, attaching embellishments and found objects to your work; painting and printing on fabrics including cotton, silk and Khadi paper; and using objects found in nature, such as leaves, to make unique and iconic prints.

The book includes four inspirational projects based on different facets of the natural world: Ocean, Rainforest, Botany, Birds and Animals. Stitched Textiles: The Natural World also features examples of the author, Steph Redfern’s own intricate and detailed works based on nature, exploring the means by which the pieces have been created, and the wonderful stories behind Steph’s journey as an artist.

The wealth of information and visual stimuli in Stitched Textiles: The Natural World is intended to inspire the reader to create their own works inspired by nature, beginning by exploring the use of sketchbooks and study pages, progressing to picking out iconic elements from sketches and photographs, and eventually assembling a stunning, personal piece of stitched textile work on fabric or on cotton-blend Khadi paper, applying handstitch in metallic threads, or machine stitch in whimsical and beautiful patterns, and embellishing with natural beads or found objects.

Another Relevant Post:

Stitch Mindspace

Stitch Mindspace: Knit Stitch/Embroidery Books

Layered Pages Journal BannerPart I:

My main focus this year on mix media projects are adding stitching, knitting and embroidery so I thought, “Why not create an online catalog of the books I want to acquire on the subject?” This blog post is part one of my catalog and I hope this will be a great source for my fellow mix media artists to follow. Down below I will add the links to my other books in this series are that relevant to this blogging journey. If you have any book recommendations on this subject, please leave a comment in the comment area. I hope you all have a great week and I hope to see y’all back tomorrow here at Layered Pages! -Stephanie

Stitch Dictionary by Lucinda GandertonStitch Dictionary by Lucinda Ganderton

Four Star Review on Goodreads:

‘The art of embroidery has been defined simply as the ornamentation of textiles with decorative stitchery.’

In this book, Lucinda Ganderton provides a clearly illustrated, step by step guide to over 200 decorative and practical stitches. A copy of this book has been part of my reference library for almost ten years, and I refer to it whenever I am looking for a decorative stitch for a particular purpose or when I need to remind myself exactly how to work a particular stitch.

‘It is an ancient craft which encompasses a wealth of history, and the same stiches are used by embroiderers throughout the world.’

After a section entitled ‘How to Use This Book’, this book contains six chapters. The first chapter covers the equipment, threads and fabrics used for stitchery, and the different techniques involved. This is followed by a library of the 234 stitches featured within the book, with the page reference to the instructions for each particular stitch.

For example: Back Stitch Rings (p102). Turn to page 102 for pictures of how to work the stitch, advice on what it is useful for and the method used and materials required to work this intermediate level stitch. I could have really used this book when I was attempting my first French knots!

The stitches are organised into four categories:
Line and Border Stitches
Filling Stitches
Openwork Stitches
Needlepoint Stitches

The colour illustrations for each stitch are clear and uncluttered, and there is an illustration of the completed stitch as well.
I most recently referred to this book for decorative border stitches for some applique I’m attempting. The only problem I have is that there are so many different stitches to choose from: an entire world of possibilities.”

-Jennifer Cameron-Smith

AlterKnit Stitch Dictionary 200 Modern Knitting MotifsAlterKnit Stitch Dictionary: 200 Modern Knitting Motifs

Break the rules–knit outside the lines!

AlterKnit Stitch Dictionary takes an unexpected look at stranded colorwork with 200 new motifs. These non-traditional colorwork charts are perfect for the creative knitter looking to break away from the ordinary. Derived from graphic design elements, these fresh motifs include everything from geometric mountains, waves, and spirals to modern bikes, skulls, and sheep.

Dive into stranded colorwork with confidence with a section on reading charts, working floats, and choosing colors. Learn how stranded colorwork can be used in design with five accompanying projects including mitts, cowls, and sweaters. Plus, use your imagination to modify, deconstruct, and combine the unique motifs to create your own designs.

Be inspired to break the rules and use charts in creative ways with AlterKnit Stitch Dictionary.

Embroidery A Step-by-Step Guide to More than 200 StitchesEmbroidery: A Step-by-Step Guide to More than 200 Stitches

Embroidery is the ultimate stitch dictionary and the ideal guide to embroidery, whatever your level of expertise.

The perfect reference guide to needlework, Embroidery is a comprehensive guide to inspire and inform sewers of all levels. Find advice on which thread, needles, or fabrics work with which techniques, and take a look at an incredible 200 stitches — with levels of difficulty, step-by-step instructions, and ideas on where and how to use them.

This practical guide covers sewing tips for dressmaking, needlepoint, and embroidery stitches, with detailed information simply presented in illustration-rich pages. With Embroidery it’s easy to find exactly which stitch is right for your next sewing project.

Other Relevant posts:

Book Wish-List: Visible Mending

 

Saturday Sunday: Weekend Vibes

tea cup image

Photo by Stephanie Hopkins

I want to thank you all for your support and visiting Layered Pages. Have a bless weekend. See you on Monday!

“We always have to choose to live our lives to the fullest.  No one is better or worse than anyone else.  We are different and beautiful.” ~ Mattie Stepanek

Stitch Mindspace: Calm

Mix Media Image for bannersThe movement of hand stitching slows my mind down and clears out all the day’s clutter. I’m able to focus and explore my creative side and be at peace with myself. With stitching the sky’s the limit. There is no right or wrong way to stitch. Your expression is your own. My stitching is free form and without the industrial look-if you will. When beginning your journey in finding your inner stitch-as I like to call it- you will be astonished with how quickly you grow as a person and your outlook on life!

Brush your fingers along the fabrics and adsorb the colors and textures. Be in the moment. You’ll be inspired. You’ll be at peace. Calm. -Stephanie

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Jewelry In The Making With Sarah

SarahToday my friend Sarah Volkert is a guest on Layered Pages to share her creative journey with us. When I met Sarah a few months ago at a Posh n Sip and I was thrilled to discover her creative side and it is always exciting to discover fellow artists. Let’s get our art on! 

Sarah, it is a pleasure to be featuring your jewelry line on Layered Pages today! When I first met you and discovered that you have a creative side to you, I was overjoyed! Tell me how you got into jewelry making?

Thank you so much for featuring me on your page, Stephanie! I got into jewelry making about 5 years ago, but it was not my first crafting love. I cross-stitch, crochet, and knit as well. So, I was at a craft store one day and noticed a beading magazine that featured bead stitching (I didn’t know that was a “thing”) and it looked interesting, so I bought the magazine and supplies to make a bracelet. I picked it up very quickly, and I spent about 3 years learning and practicing before I started selling my items.

Is there a specific style you stick with or do you mix it up?

I think I mix it up a little too much, to be honest! I personally have an eclectic style, and there is just so much that I think is beautiful and interests me that it’s hard to pick one. If I had to narrow it down, I’d say my style is modern and/or boho.

What are the platforms you sell on?

I have a shop on Etsy and I sell on Poshmark. About 90% of the jewelry items I have for sale on Poshmark are made by me.

What are some ways you upcycle pieces you might use to make your creations?

I save beer bottle caps and pop tops to make jewelry with, although I have yet to list any pieces. I’m hoping to get to that within the next couple of months. I’ve also had jewelry I’ve bought break and I will save the beads and chain from those and make a new piece out of them.

Sarah 4

How much time a week do you spend on your jewelry making?

I’m lucky if I get a few hours!

I’m a stay-at-home mom and my kids are young (5 and 2), but I try to squeeze in an hour here and there when I can. There are also the other aspects of running a business that need my attention and take time away from creating. Christmas is always crazy, but after everything settles down my goal is to spend at least 8 hours a week on creating.

What advice would you give someone who wants to get into making jewelry?

There are so many possibilities with what you can do, it’s pretty overwhelming. I would tell someone to pick one technique or stitch they would like to learn to do, but don’t invest a lot of money into it until you’re sure it’s something you’re going to enjoy. Also, I think it’s pretty easy to get discouraged, especially when you’re starting out, so if something isn’t working or you’re getting confused or frustrated, just take a break from it for an hour or a day and come back. I still have to do that from time to time!