Interview with Author Dianne Greenlay

Stephanie: Born and raised on the Canadian prairies, Dianne Greenlay is the author of the hilarious story, THE CAMPING GUY, as well as QUINTSPINNER – A PIRATE’S QUEST and DEADLY MISFORTUNE, Books One and Two in a fast-paced award – winning adventure series, set in the 1700’s, in the pirate-infested waters of the West Indies. Greenlay is also a playwright, producer, and Creative Director of the long-running community theater group, Darkhorse Theatre. She is fluent in at least her mother tongue and she thanks her fierce English teachers for that. More of her thoughts on life can be found at http://www.diannegreenlay.com

Dianne, it is a pleasure to be speaking with you today! Congrats on winning the BRAG Medallion. I’ve heard wonderful things about your novel, Quintspinner: A Pirate’s Quest. Please tell me a little about your story?

 

Dianne Greenlay
Dianne: Thank you Stephanie! I am so pleased to have Quintspinner be awarded the BRAG Medallion. It is a story of Tess Willoughby, a young woman living in the 1700’s who, upon witnessing the murder of an old Seer, comes into possession of the woman’s strange Spinner ring.

As though this incident is the key to unlocking a strange future for her, Tess soon finds herself to be an unwilling passenger on a merchant ship bound for the pirate-infested waters of the pirate infested waters of the West Indies. Worse yet, she is forcibly betrothed to the murderer, who has not recognized her as being the witness to his crime.

While I knew that I was writing an action story in the historical genre, I was soon surprised to realize that readers were also drawn to both the thriller and romance elements in the story line. Here is the book’s description:

 

Dianne book cover

Even in the year 1717, one month, one week, or one day, can make all the difference in the world.

One month and a day ago, Tess Willoughby was the daughter of a well-to-do physician in London.

One month ago, she witnessed the murder of an old seer and came into possession of the dead woman’s odd ring – an ancient Spinner ring, known by the locals as the Ring of Prophesy.

One month less a day ago, she was wrongly accused by her father of having stolen the ring.

Three weeks ago, by her father’s arrangement for the family, she became an unwilling passenger on a merchant ship bound for the pirate-infested waters of the Caribbean.

Two weeks ago, at her father’s insistence, she became forcibly betrothed to a man who she recognized as being the seer’s murderer – a man who covets her only for her ring.

One week ago, she met a sailor and experienced the thrill of being in love for the first time.

Two days ago, she realized that such a secret love would endanger them both, and, heart-broken, she was forced to choose her loyalty.

Yesterday, her fiancé betrayed her during a pirate attack and those she loved were slaughtered.

Today, she is plotting to save her own life and perhaps to take his in retribution. The ring is urging her to decide quickly…

Tomorrow will be too late.

Stephanie: What was your inspiration to write, Quintspinner? 

Dianne: My life of being a sole charge physiotherapist and EMT in a remote rural community was pretty normal. The usual assortment of injuries (bruises, broken bones, sprains, etc.  – my patients’, not mine!) Had filled my days until a very unusual item came up in a Google search for a medical condition: women pirates.

What the heck? I didn’t even know that there were such things. Curious, I clicked on it and began to read. Well, it turns out that not only were there such characters, but there were many of them, and the lives and adventures of most of them were very well documented. In particular, I read about Anne Bonny and Mary Read, who, stranger than fiction, both disguised themselves as men, and quite by accident, ended up sailing on the very same pirate ship in the 1700’s through the West Indies. I read on, learning that these two ladies were described as being more determined and fearless than most of their male crew members, as they fought and pillaged their way up and down the Caribbean coastlines. Now this was good stuff – treasures, sea battles, brutal medical procedures, hurricanes, and swordfights!

I was hooked.

Being that these two female pirates were already well documented by writers who were much better writers than I, I didn’t dare try to retell their stories, but I thought that I could write my own story filled with characters from that era and lifestyle, and just let my imagination go wild. And, oh yeah, maybe throw in a few historical facts now and then, just to add realism. It would be easy, right? Boy, was I misguided!

It took only one sarcastic comment from an acquaintance to set me straight: “You are a prairie girl. You don’t sail. You don’t fight. You’re not even a history buff. What on earth makes you think that you could, or even should write about that stuff?”

Sometime during the pity party that I immediately had for myself, my hurt feelings began to morph that comment into a challenge.

I had also traveled frequently throughout the Caribbean islands and other tropical locations and knew that Spinner rings were offered for sale throughout the region, and since I wanted some sort of “item” to offer at book give-aways, etc, I researched their significance and wove them into my story. (Spinner rings are fashioned after ancient stone Tibetan prayer wheels, whose spinning movements were thought to enhance the effects of prayer and manifestation of good health, good fortune, and prophesy, which was a good fit for the superstitious populations of sailors and the West Indies.) I wanted there to be five rings and “Quint” sounded a little more exotic than “Five”.

 

Stephanie: That is really fascinating! How long did it take you to write your story?

Dianne: I wrote part-time for the better part of one year.

 

Stephanie: That is impressive time. Was there any research involved?
Dianne: Holy smokes, yes! Readers nowadays are really smart and I knew that there would be many of them out there who knew far more than I did about life in the 1700’s, sailing, and pirates, so I researched quite heavily, to make sure that what I was presenting in my story was historically accurate.

At one point, I had ordered in so much reference material, that I was on a first name basis with every librarian in our library, and had tables ( yes, tables!) full of binders, notebooks, scraps of paper with details that I felt I needed to know. I also visited several marine museums, and did short sails, even attempting once to haul the main sail up on a tall ship, (but failing miserably); I talked with sailors, strolled through historical sites, hoisted real cannonballs (incredibly heavy things), and made my own grog out of dark rum. (After all, I wanted to involve all my senses, right?) Along the way, I survived a near-fatal swamping of a small Zodiac boat by an Orca, and had the thrilling chill of being followed by a shark while sailing in a small Hobie cat boat. All in the normal workday of a researcher I guess…

As I began to write, I became immersed in life in the 1700’s. In my mind as I wrote, I saw my characters, felt the tilt of the ship’s planks beneath my feet (ahem … there may have been a little of that grog involved there), and at one point, while writing a sea battle full of cannon and musket fire, I thought I could actually smell the smoke. Turns out it was just my neighbor’s barbeque.

 

Stephanie: You certainly had your work cut out for you. I love research! It’s amazing when one starts to write, you get so wrapped up in your characters world. It awakens so many senses. Is as if you are really there. I love your book cover! Who designed it?
Dianne: I have a very talented designer, Derek Murphy, (of Creative Indie Covers) who has done all of my covers, and whose covers have won awards in Joel Friedlander’s ebook Covers Awards. Derek can be found at http://bookcovers.creativindie.com/

 

Stephanie: Derek did a fantastic job! What do you like most about writing historical fiction and is there any challenges to writing in this genre?

The historical genre, no matter what the time frame, seems to have a larger-than-life swashbuckling feel to it, although my research showed that the reality was often quite a gruesome existence. However, I loved being taken back in time on an adventure, while being able to include details that would inform and educate my readers.

At one point, I was in contact with Tyler R. Tychylaar, Ph.D, historian and noted historical author, whose historical award was one of several that Quintspinner won, and we discussed writing in the historical genre. He stated that it was generally agreed that the historical genre is the hardest one to write in because of the amount of time and effort that the research requires, above and beyond producing all of the ingredients that make up a great novel. I didn’t think about that when I started out, but I whole-heartedly agree now!

 

Stephanie: I completely agree! Where can readers buy your book?

 

Dianne: Quintspinner is available at Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Quintspinner-Pirates-Quest-Dianne-Greenlay/dp/1460951921/ref=sr_1_2_title_0_main?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1371351532&sr=1-2&keywords=quintspinner

 

Stephanie: What book project are you currently working on?

Dianne: I am presently working on writing Book Three in the Quintspinner series, and of course, continually marketing both Quintspinner, and Deadly Misfortune, which is the second book in the series.

 

Stephanie: How exciting! I look forward to when your new story comes out. How did you discover indieBRAG?

Dianne: I believe it was through the Layered Pages Blog :-).

 

Stephanie: Thank you, Dianne!

 

A message from indieBRAG:

We are delighted that Stephanie has chosen to interview Dianne Greenlay who is the author of, Quintspinner , one of our medallion honorees at www.bragmedallion.com . To be awarded a B.R.A.G. MedallionTM, a book must receive unanimous approval by a group of our readers. It is a daunting hurdle and it serves to reaffirm that a book such as, Quintspinner merits the investment of a reader’s time and money.

 

Interview with Author Sue Fortin

Stephanie: Sue Fortin writes women’s fiction; contemporary, suspense and time-slip, all with romance and a touch of danger. Lover of cake, France and dragonflies. Hater of calories, maths and snakes. Sue lives in West Sussex with her family and daft, old Labrador called Tess. She writes for the on-line emag, Loveahappyending Lifestyle Magazine, about crafts and hobbies. She is one ninth of The Romaniacs where she blogs regularly and, when not there, can be found at her own blog, Love Reading, Love Books, LLM Bookshelf, on Twitter and on Facebook.

Sue is a member of the Romantic Novelists’ Association under their New Writers’ Scheme and published her award winning, debut novel ‘United State of Love‘ in 2012. This is available in both paperback and digital format through Amazon.

 

Sue Fortin

 

Hello Sue! Congrats on winning the BRAG Medallion and I’m delighted to be chatting with you today. Pease tell me about your book, United State of Love.

 

Sue: Hi Stephanie, thank you so much, I was absolutely thrilled my book received the BRAG Medallion. I’m delighted to be here, it’s a real honour.

 

Okay, my book United State of Love, is essentially about a single parent, Anna, whose estranged husband comes back into her life unexpectedly, apparently seeking reconciliation. This coincides with her starting a new relationship where naively, she thinks she can keep the two worlds apart, but they are on a collision course. The novel also looks at the deeper issues of family life; teenage angst, moving on in life, accepting and atoning for the past, but all in keeping with the genre of the book.

 

Stephanie: I’m intrigued with the premise of your story and that’s a great title for your book. How did you come up with it? And who designed it?

 

Sue: I wanted the title to reflect that this was a story about two people who were united in their love for each other, but had a whole load of other issues to deal with first. It tied in nicely with the hero being American.

 

The cover has been through something of a transformation recently. The original cover, which I loved and was very much ‘me’, didn’t quite shout loud enough what the novel was about. So it was redesigned into something a bit more fun and in keeping with the romance/chicklit genre. Both covers were designed by Avalon Graphics who did a wonderful job, despite my vague ideas.

 

Untited states of love

 

Stephanie: That is really creative was on how you came up with you title. Who or what inspired you to write your story?

 

Sue: I’ve always been a bit of a romantic daydreamer and I just had this scene in my head about a woman being spotted with her ex-husband by her lover and how this could be misinterpreted. It just grew from there, however, this particular scene never actually made it into the final version of the novel.

 

Stephanie: Where there any challenges?

 

Sue: Many! I was completely naive about the whole writing and publishing process. I have to say without the advice and hand-holding of more experienced writers than myself, it would have been a very painful process.

 

Stephanie:  Is this your first novel published?

 

Sue: It is. I am a member of the Romantic Novelists’ Association under the New Writers’ Scheme and United State of Love went through their reading scheme in 2012, where it received a second read. I had a fantastically helpful critique back which was extremely encouraging. At the same time I also submitted my novel to a publisher and it made an acquisitions meeting but didn’t get any further. Spurred on by some great feedback, I decided it was the right time to publish United State of Love myself.

 

Stephanie: How did you discover indieBRAG?

 

Sue: Through one of your previous honourees, Pauline Barclay. One of her novels received the award and after reading her blog, I was able to follow the links to the indieBRAG website.

 

Stephanie: Where can readers buy your book?

 

Sue: It’s available in both digital and paperback format from Amazon.co.uk, Amazon.com, Feed-A-Read and your wonderful selves!

 

Stephanie:  Is there a book project you are currently working on?

 

Sue: There is indeed. This one is more of a romantic suspense with the working title of ‘Closing In’. It’s about a woman who takes drastic action to escape a volatile relationship, but realizes that you can’t always out run your past.

 

Stephanie: Sounds very interesting and I’m sure it would touch home with many of your readers. Where do you see the self-publishing industry in five to ten years?

 

Sue: That’s a tough one. I think it’s a rapidly expanding area for writers but will, in time, reach a peak and level out as the mainstream publishers pick up the successful indie authors. Self-publishing will have two strings; one for those who absolutely don’t want a publishing contract and the other, for those who can use it as a springboard to get a traditional publishing deal.

 

 

Stephanie: Sue, thank you!

Thank you! It’s been an absolute pleasure.

A message from indieBRAG:

We are delighted that Stephanie has chosen to interview Sue Fortin who is the author of,United State of Love , one of our medallion honorees at www.bragmedallion.com . To be awarded a B.R.A.G. MedallionTM, a book must receive unanimous approval by a group of our readers. It is a daunting hurdle and it serves to reaffirm that a book such as, United State of Love merits the investment of a reader’s time and money.

Interview with Author Laura Wharton

Stephanie: Hello Laura! Thank you for chatting with me today about your book and congrats on winning the BRAG Medallion. I noticed your story (Leaving Lukens) is set in 1942 and it’s a mystery. Please tell me a little about it and who designed your book cover.

Laura: Leaving Lukens is the story of 17-year-old Ella who faces leaving the only home she’s ever known: Lukens, a small fishing village on an isolated peninsula across the river from Oriental, North Carolina. Impacted by the economy, the threat of war, and the loss of a school teacher who was rowed across the river daily to teach the few remaining children in Lukens, the townspeople are dismantling their homes and floating them across the river on barges to larger communities of Oriental and Beaufort – moving away to find work in New Bern with its growing shipyard which is hiring to build minesweepers in support of the war or to the nearby military base of Cherry Point. Ella’s convinced she can stay on by herself, but spying a Nazi patrol raft surprises her one evening. She quickly learns that the war is very real and very near. A visiting sailor who has come to Lukens under the guise of helping his aunt and uncle dismantle their home and relocate to New Bern befriends Ella and shows her that sometimes looking isn’t exactly seeing what’s truly in front of her. As you might guess, he may not be all he appears to be.

 

The book has been hailed as a work of suspenseful mystery, and has landed me on the North Carolina Literary Trail, for which I am honored. The lovely cover was done by designer Dawn Mitchell at g4ginteractive. (http://www.g4ginteractive.com/).

 

leaving Lukens

 

Stephanie: Is this your first published novel or are there others? If so, what are the titles and genre they are written in?

Laura: Leaving Lukens is my second novel. The first was The Pirate’s Bastard, which was nominated for the Sir Walter Raleigh Award for Fiction. It too is a historical adventure – a bit of a pirate story – set in colonial North Carolina. Like Leaving Lukens, it can be read by teens (YA) and adults.

I’ve also written two children’s mysteries. One is Mystery at the Phoenix Festival. The other, which is the first in the Mystery at the Lake House, is titled, Monsters Below. I wrote both books with the input from children, and we had so much fun with the projects. The second book in the Mystery at the Lake House series is titled, The Mermaid’s Tale and is in outline stage at this point. Both are suitable for readers age’s six to 12.

 

Stephanie: What inspired you to write Leaving Lukens and was there any research involved?

Laura: I read a small calendar listing of an event held yearly for descendants’ of Lukens (yes, it was once a real village. The only thing that remains of it is a cemetery, which does figure into the storyline of Leaving Lukens). I researched all I could about Lukens, the time period including the music and foods, the way New Bern was at the time, USOs, military history, and especially German U-boat activities during the Battle of the Atlantic. Fortunately, I’m a research nut, and I love history – so this was as much fun as writing the story.

 

Stephanie: How long did it take to write your story and were there any challenges?

Laura: It took me six months to research and write the book. It was far easier to research than my first novel because back then, the internet wasn’t what it is today. (That one took me six years to write, and another six years to find a publisher for its release.) I truly enjoy going to New Bern and Oriental, and I was inspired at a conference I attended in New Bern hosted by the North Carolina Maritime History Council. By walking the streets of New Bern, the story truly came together in my head.

The challenge, as always, is making time to write. I love the researching and writing process, and once I start a project, I easily get lost in my characters. It’s hard to extract myself from “their world” to go make dinner, tend to my family, do chores, or do my other work as a remote marketing specialist for a community college, but that’s what many writers do: we juggle.

 

Stephanie: What is your current writing project?

Laura: I’m currently developing characters and researching for an adult story tentatively titled, In Julia’s Garden. It is a mixture of suspenseful contemporary and historical fiction, and it’s a lot of fun. Like Leaving Lukens and The Pirate’s Bastard, it will be a work of “faction” – a mix of fact and fiction. The historical setting is based on a real antebellum mansion and garden located in Columbia, South Carolina, and the contemporary part is set in downtown Winston-Salem. My plan is to develop into a series, but we’ll see what the characters have to say about that idea.

Stephanie: What advice would you give to an aspiring author?

Laura: Keep at it. If you believe in your story, then write it, refine it, and keep pushing it out of the nest that is your brain. Only you can give it wings!

Stephanie: How did you discover indieBRAG?

Laura: Another author whom I greatly admire showcased her BRAG medallion on Facebook. I looked into it then, and submitted Leaving Lukens for consideration. I’m delighted my book was chosen as an honoree.

 

Stephanie: How often do you write and what do you do to get in the mindset of writing?

Laura: Ideally, I write daily for two very early-morning hours. Some days offer more time. To get into the mindset is easy if time allows – I typically review what I’ve written the day before, and it just flows from there.

 

Stephanie: What are you currently reading and what do you plan on reading next?

Laura: I’m reading a nonfiction by Richard Zacks, The Pirate Hunter about Captain Kidd. I have a notion to write a “sequel” to The Pirate’s Bastard one day. Next book to start reading is my reference book on gardening, which I’ll refer to often as I develop the setting for In Julia’s Garden. I also enjoy adventures by Ted Bell, and Ian Fleming, and mysteries by Jane Tesh.

 

Stephanie: What is your favorite literary genre?

Laura: I enjoy adventures and mysteries most of all, but a solid non-fiction like Operation Mincemeat or The Map  is often a great backup for research and pleasure reading.

 

Stephanie :Laura, thank you! It was a pleasure chatting with you!  

Laura: Thank you for the interview!

 

Author Links & Picture

 

Laura Wharton

 

http://www.LauraWhartonBooks.com

http://www.LauraWharton.blogspot.com

http://www.twitter.com/LauraSWharton

https://www.amazon.com/author/laurawharton

 

A message from indieBRAG:

We are delighted that Stephanie has chosen to interview Laura Wharton who is the author of, Leaving Lukens, one of our medallion honorees at www.bragmedallion.com . To be awarded a B.R.A.G. MedallionTM, a book must receive unanimous approval by a group of our readers. It is a daunting hurdle and it serves to reaffirm that a book such as, Leaving Lukens merits the investment of a reader’s time and money.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Review/Q&A: Sons of the Wolf by Paula Lofting

Publish Date: July 23, 2012

Publisher: SilverWood Books

Sold by: Amazon Digital Services, Inc.

Language: English

ASIN: B008OK4HF2

Sons of The Wolf Book Cover

 

 About Sons of the Wolf

1054, pious King Edward sits on the throne, spending his days hunting, sleeping and praying, leaving the security of his kingdom to his more capable brother-in-law Harold Godwinson, the powerful Earl of Wessex.

Against this backdrop we meet Wulfhere, a Sussex thegn who, as the sun sets over the wild forest of Andredesweald, is returning home victoriously from a great battle in the north. Holding his lands directly from the King, his position demands loyalty to Edward himself, but Wulfhere is duty-bound to also serve Harold, a bond forged within Wulfhere’s family heritage and borne of the ancient Teutonic ideology of honour and loyalty.

Wulfhere is a man with the strength and courage of a bear, a warrior whose loyalty to his lord and king is unquestionable. He is also a man who holds his family dear and would do anything to protect them. So when Harold demands that he wed his daughter to the son of Helghi, his sworn enemy, Wulfhere has to find a way to save his daughter from a life of certain misery in the household of the cruel and resentful Helghi, without comprising his honour and loyalty to his lord, Harold. On the battlefield, Wulfhere fights for his life but elsewhere the enemy is closer to home, sinister and shadowy and far more dangerous than any war.

My review:

 

Paula Lofting brings the reader an enthralling story! Sons of The Wolf, the first to a series of novels that leads up to the Norman Conquest. Of a man named Wulfhere who lived during the rule of Edward the Confessor. The lands that he holds come from the king. Wulfhere also serves my favorite male heroines in history, Harold Godwinson. Harold is the Earl of Wessex and extremely powerful and has great influence in the realm. Wulfhere is a warrior who loves his family and has a soft spot for his daughters. When Harold tells him, he must give his daughter, Freyda to his sworn enemy-horrid Lord Helghi- son to marry. He becomes angry but nonetheless he must agree to Harold’s wishes. For Harold grows tired of the never ending hatred between his two Lords. But all is not well and Wulfhere must do all he can to save his daughter from the dangers he knows will happen if she falls in the grasps of Lord Helghi and there is an even bigger threat that could change his family forever.

As this captivating story unfolds I found myself so engrossed with the characters plight and emotions I felt like these events were happening to my own family. Saying this story has well developed characters does not do it justice. It goes beyond that…Lofting really gets to the core of the human condition and pulls you into a world of the past that leaves you wanting to explore more of these fascinating people in history.

The first few pages grabbed me and didn’t let go and now I’m anxiously awaiting for the sequel to this remarkable story. Sons of the Wolf is definitely a novel of what the highest quality of Historical Fiction should be and I highly recommend!

About Author

Paula Lofting

My name is Paula Lofting and I write historical fiction. My first novel is called Sons of the Wolf, set in 11thc England. I like to keep things as accurate as I can when I am writing historically and belong to a re-enactment society, Regia Anglorum that covers the period in which I write. This enables me to have some knowledge of the time I write in of the everyday things and not just the politics and events of the time. Living history is a big part of what Regia do and everything has to be well researched for authenticity.

My earliest influences in reading were Rosemary Sutcliffe, Edith Pargetter, Leon Garfield, Mary Stewart and Sharon Kay Penman. Rosemary Sutcliffe really got me into Dark Age history. I love her style and am reading Manda Scott currently whose style is heavily influenced by Sutcliffe’s.

Aside from enjoying historical fiction set in pre-conquest years, I also enjoy later medieval, ancient and anything in later periods that would interest me. I also enjoy crime, horror and thrillers. Erotica is not really for me but I appreciate the skill you must need to write in that genre.

I am a psychiatric nurse by day and writer in my spare time. I have three children and live in the beautiful county of Sussex, England, where my book is set. I am currently working on the sequel which I hope to have released in the late summer or early Autumn!

Paula’s website: www.paulalofting.com

 

Twitter – http://twitter.com/paulalofting

 

indieBRAG: www.bragmedallion.com

 

 

Q&A with Paula

 

Stephanie: Hello Paula! Thank you for chatting with me today. It’s a pleasure to have you back on Layered Pages. Today, I want to ask you some fun questions and about your reading habits. What book is on your night stand now?

Paula:  Hi Stephanie, it’s lovely to have this opportunity to be with you on my Blog Tour. I have 3 books on my bedside cabinet at the moment; Insurrection, by Robyn Young, Lionheart by Sharon Penman and The Horseman’s Desire by my old childhood friend Lorraine Hunt Lynn.

Stephanie: What book would you highly recommend to a friend to read?

Paula:  It would really depend on what they liked to read but if they were into their medieval history, it would be anything by Sharon Penman or Bernard Cornwell’s Saxon Chronicles.

Stephanie: What book had the greatest impact on you?

Paula: I think it was The Sun in Spleandour.

Stephanie: What were your favorite books as a child? Do you have a favorite character from those books or a hero?

Paula: I loved the Narnia books, Rosemary Sutcliffe’s books, Leon Garfield’s stories set in the 18thc. Most of all Oliver Twist. I always fancied myself as the tragic heroine Nancy. I’ve always been a Drama Queen!

Stephanie: What person in history would you like to be?

Paula: Perhaps the most exciting person I would want to have been was Aethelfaed, Lady of the Mercians.

Stephanie: What is your favorite event in history?

Paula: Probably not for the right reasons, but I am so hooked on the Norman Conquest of England and the events after it that I guess I have to say that time. It was a terrible tragedy for the English and King Harold. A lot of people think that the Norman’s brought a lot of things to England that we didn’t have but that wasn’t true. England already had a very efficient centralised government and law system. Women were more independent from their men and were respected by law. The Norman’s changed all that.

Stephanie: You are having a dinner party and you are inviting ten people over. If you could invite anyone you wanted over, who would it be? And it can be anyone from the past as well.

Paula:  I would invite Lady Aethelflaed, after all, if I wanted to be her, I should get to know her. Laurel and Hardy, to make everyone laugh; Harold Godwinson, so I could check him out. Apparently he was very handsome. Richard III, to ask him if he did it. Sharon Penman, such a gracious lady. Rosemary Sutcliffe, to ask her where she got her inspiration from. Edward the Confessor to ask him what the hell he was playing at by not naming a successor. Edward II, he was such a dude! And Anne Frank, to give her a hug.

Thank you, Paula!

Giveaway!

 

As part of this indieBRAG Tour, Paula is giving away 9 e-book copies and one paperback of Sons of the Wolf. To enter the giveaway, send your contact information to her at sonsofthewolf1066@googlemail.com

 

Giveaway draw will be on June 25.

Sons of the Wolf Book Tour Banner

IndieBRAG Blog Tour with Author Paula Lofting & Giveaway

 

Sons of The Wolf Book Cover

 

About Sons of the Wolf

 

1054, pious King Edward sits on the throne, spending his days hunting, sleeping and praying, leaving the security of his kingdom to his more capable brother-in-law Harold Godwinson, the powerful Earl of Wessex.

 

Against this backdrop we meet Wulfhere, a Sussex thegn who, as the sun sets over the wild forest of Andredesweald, is returning home victoriously from a great battle in the north. Holding his lands directly from the King, his position demands loyalty to Edward himself, but Wulfhere is duty-bound to also serve Harold, a bond forged within Wulfhere’s family heritage and borne of the ancient Teutonic ideology of honour and loyalty.

 

Wulfhere is a man with the strength and courage of a bear, a warrior whose loyalty to his lord and king is unquestionable. He is also a man who holds his family dear and would do anything to protect them. So when Harold demands that he wed his daughter to the son of Helghi, his sworn enemy, Wulfhere has to find a way to save his daughter from a life of certain misery in the household of the cruel and resentful Helghi, without comprising his honour and loyalty to his lord, Harold. On the battlefield, Wulfhere fights for his life but elsewhere the enemy is closer to home, sinister and shadowy and far more dangerous than any war.

 

Its not too late to win a free copy of Sons of the Wolf. Email Paula on sonsofthewolf1066@googlemail.com for a chance to win. There are 10 copies to be won! I highly recommend!

 

Sons of the Wolf Book Tour Banner

 

 

 

 

Reviews for 2014

Pretty soon I will be working on the list of books I will be reviewing for 2014. If you’re interested in me reviewing your lovely novel, give me a shout out! Remember, I favor Historical Fiction (no erotica, witchcraft or paranormal) and I will only be accepting 12 books for review! Oh, and one more thing….I’m adding Christian Fiction to the list! Thanks!

 

layeredpages@yahoo.com for my review guidelines!

 

Stephanie

Layered Pages

Review: Her Majesty’s Will by David Blixt

david Blixt

 

If you have ever wondered about the lost years in Shakespeare’s life look no further.  In Her Majesty’s Will, David Blixt has created a funny, lighthearted historical fiction where Shakespeare unwittingly joins Christopher Marlow to serve their queen as spies in a tragic comedy of their own making.  While Shakespeare and Marlow work to save the queen we are taken on a tour of bawdy London taverns as they outwit many a foe.

The characters in this volume are cheeky, clever, and cunning.  The settings are well described and both character and time are believable and engaging.  Mr. Blixt has created a story which is both grounded in history and filled with speculation.  Full of action, twists, and surprises, this is a great beach read.  It was a delightful change of pace to have this comic historical fiction in my reading pile.

While I am not put off by this, I feel that it bears mentioning that there is some sexual tension between Will and Kit that certain readers may find unsettling.  Also of note, Mr. Blixt makes use of some phrases in Latin or French throughout the story, which at times are undefined.  I did not find this detracting from the story, nor did I feel that I was missing any important information by skimming over them.  I could, however, see how not knowing what these phrases mean could be off putting or frustrating to some readers.  I would give this book 3.5 stars.  The story is fun and light and I would recommend this to anyone who has an interest in Shakespeare, historical fiction, Christopher Marlow, or action/adventure stories.

 

Brandy Strake

Layered Pages Review Team Admin