Interview with B.R.A.G. Medallion Honoree Elle Jacklee

Elle-Jacklee BRAGI’d like to welcome B.R.A.G. Medallion Honoree Elle Jacklee to talk with me today about her book, The Tree of Minala. Elle’s professional titles have included software programmer, bilingual sales rep, and proposal specialist. But her favorite title, besides wife and mother, is author! It’s the only one that lets her call daydreaming “research”. She lives in Wisconsin with her husband and two young sons, none of whom are in a hurry to grow up, and that’s just fine with her!

Thank you for chatting with me today, Elle! Tell me how you discovered indiebrag?

Thanks very much for having me! I discovered indieBrag when I was book shopping online and saw a book listed as a B.R.A.G. medallion honoree. I’d already read the book so I knew the high quality of it, and I’ve since gone on to read other wonderful titles that have earned the same distinction.

Please tell me a little about your story, The Tree of Mindala and how you came up with the title.

Sure. The main character, Miranda Moon, has always had a vivid imagination, and it’s had a way of getting her into trouble. But when she and her younger brother are mysteriously thrust into Wunderwood, a world they never knew existed, a world where magic flows through the trees, and everyone knows their family name, where an evil villain has a score to settle with every branch of their family tree, Miranda realizes everything she’s imagined may not be fiction after all. When she discovers her own role in the villain’s sudden release from a long banishment, she knows it’s up to her to stop him before he destroys the entire realm. The only problem is, the one thing that could save it has just as much chance as dooming it forever.

The name “Mindala” is actually an anagram of a name in my family.

What was your inspiration in creating your character, Miranda Moon?

I always had a vivid imagination as a child, and I think most kids do. (Some of us never grow out of it, apparently 😉 I think it’s one of the best things about being a child, and it’s also the reason I think kids will find Miranda easy to relate to. Who, during their childhood, hasn’t been in that position? Of believing in something so deeply even though other people, especially people older than them, think is silly or couldn’t possibly be real? I think the moment we stop believing in those things, when some of that wonder starts to fade, is a bit sad. So Miranda’s story explores the question of “What if it’s not just your imagination?” And I hope her story is also a reminder to always look for those things in life that are magic in their own way. The idea is that what’s real is magic and what’s magic is real. It’s all just a matter of perspective.

The Tree of Mindala BRAGDescribe Wunderwood.

Imagine flowers and leaves and trees in shapes, colors, and sizes you’ve never seen before. Then imagine animals, some familiar, some unlike any you’ve seen before, that stand on two legs and speak in your language. Imagine, not lightning, but black, jagged bolts that rip through the sky. And people who use magic and have other unique abilities. I hope this gives you a taste of it, but there’s much more to discover in the pages of the book…

What is the mood or tone your characters portray and how does this affect the story?

The characters are all different, each with their own characteristics that can be to their advantage or not, depending on the circumstances. Though serious topics and important questions are raised for the readers to ask themselves, the tone is humorous and sometimes whimsical, so that it’s all easy for them to digest.

What are the emotional triggers of your characters and how do they act on them?

Miranda is sensitive about her active imagination so it’s no wonder that she’s driven to find out everything she can about Wunderwood. It validates her position that just because something seems “unbelievable” or “fantastical” or “impossible”, doesn’t mean that it is, that it can’t be real.

I can imagine you had great fun writing this story. Did you face any challenges?

I had a blast writing this book and its sequel! My main challenge was finding time to write it. I’m a mom of two rambunctious young boys who keep me very busy! But I have recently made the commitment to writing full-time (or as close as a busy mom can get to “full-time” 😉 so I’ll be able to produce much faster than I had in the past.

Could you share an excerpt?

““Where are we?” Marcus whispered.

Miranda took another slow look around. “I don’t know exactly… but it seems like we may be inside the globe I found under the floor in our bedroom at the cabin… or maybe the globe is a replica of a real place, and we’ve somehow been transported there.”

Marcus crossed his arms and rolled his eyes at Miranda, which was his usual reaction to her storytelling.

“Well, look around you!” Miranda’s arm swept their surroundings. “This doesn’t look like the bedroom we were in a second ago, does it? But it does look like the scene in this water globe. You explain it!” Miranda held the globe up in front of Marcus for emphasis, and at that moment, the ground rose beneath them. She slowly pulled the globe back toward her, and the ground beneath their feet fell at the same rate back to where it had been.

“I think this world is being affected by what happens in this world!” Miranda whispered, pointing to the water globe. Slowly, Marcus approached the curious trinket while Miranda gazed at it from above. That’s when they discovered the miniature versions of themselves inside. Something else was different, too. A candle’s flame flickered orange through the little house’s door, which was ajar.

“That’s strange,” Miranda said. “I’m pretty sure that door was completely closed the first time I saw it through this thing.”

That’s strange?!””

Where can readers buy your book?

“It’s currently available on Amazon, and will soon be available at all the major retailers.”

What is up next for you?

I’m continuing to work on the Wunderwood Series (I’ve planned for 4 books in all). I am also working on two other projects. One is the conclusion to my Etchings and Embers series (a Muirwood fan-fiction series, the first of which you can find here .) The second is also unrelated to Wunderwood, but my muse insists it require my immediate attention J But Wunderwood Book 2, The Triad of the Tree, is now available!

Thanks again, Stephanie, for having me! It was a pleasure!

Author Links:

Amazon

Website

Facebook

Twitter

A message from indieBRAG:

We are delighted that Stephanie has chosen to Elle Jacklee who is the author of, The Tree of Mindala, our medallion honoree at indieBRAG. To be awarded a B.R.A.G. Medallion ®, a book must receive unanimous approval by a group of our readers. It is a daunting hurdle and it serves to reaffirm that a book such as, The Tree of Mindala, merits the investment of a reader’s time and money.

indiebrag team member

Cover Crush: The SPY MISTRESS by Jennifer Chiaverini

Cover Crush banner

Many of you know I’m working on a fiction book about the Reconstruction of the South. What a terrible and tragic time in our history. Many people do not know how the south was rebuilt after the war and what the people went through. It affected everyone. One of the things I am doing while researching is also reading fiction books about the war and aftermath. One needs to be immersed!

The Spy Mistress came to my attention a while back and I have been drawn to the cover ever since. The woman in the picture allures such grace, intelligence, mystery and deep in thought. One wonders at the paper in her hand and what it says. Obviously it has made an impression on her. Not only that the cover truly draws in the atmosphere of the past.

Below is the book description of the story.  Though I hear often, that this book is completely one-sided, that is glorifies the north and the characters are lacking depth. Though I can’t stand the political correct, I am curious about the story!

Stephanie M. Hopkins

Spy mistress

Born to slave-holding aristocracy in Richmond, Virginia, and educated by Northern Quakers, Elizabeth Van Lew was a paradox of her time. When her native state seceded in April 1861, Van Lew’s convictions compelled her to defy the new Confederate regime. Pledging her loyalty to the Lincoln White House, her courage would never waver, even as her wartime actions threatened not only her reputation, but also her life.

Van Lew’s skills in gathering military intelligence were unparalleled. She helped to construct the Richmond Underground and orchestrated escapes from the infamous Confederate Libby Prison under the guise of humanitarian aid. Her spy ring’s reach was vast, from clerks in the Confederate War and Navy Departments to the very home of Confederate President Jefferson Davis.

Although Van Lew was inducted posthumously into the Military Intelligence Hall of Fame, the astonishing scope of her achievements has never been widely known. In Chiaverini’s riveting tale of high-stakes espionage, a great heroine of the Civil War finally gets her due.

Be sure to check out my Wish-List 5: The American Civil War!

Check out this week’s other cover crush over at

Flashlight Commentary-Cover Crush 

2 Kids and Tired Books-Cover Crush 

A Bookaholic Swede-Cover Crush 

The Maidens Court-Cover Crush 

 

The Real Lincoln: A New Look at Abraham Lincoln, His Agenda, and an Unnecessary War by Thomas DiLorenzo

One of my current writing projects is a thriller based historical events that take place during the Reconstruction of the South in Georgia. I have always been interested in the American Civil War (War between the States) and have always wanted to go further in-depth with my research. The American Civil War is so much more complex than many people realize. Much of my research takes me back much further than I expected to go. All the way back to our Founding Father’s-whose sacrifice and passions forged a great nation. A nation for the People. Anyhow, to get back on what I was saying before-My story’s setting I’m working on takes place in Atlanta and Madison, Georgia. I won’t go into great detail about it just yet but it does take place in the modern times and reveals families in the past torn apart by war, betrayal, and murder while trying to put their lives back together during the Reconstruction.

One of the books I came across on my research Journey is The REAL Lincoln. I am thoroughly intrigued with this book and the authors perspective. Take a look at the book blurb. If you are an enthusiast of American History, I highly recommend this book.

 Stephanie M. Hopkins

The Real Lincoln

A New Look at Abraham Lincoln, His Agenda, and an Unnecessary War

Most Americans consider Abraham Lincoln to be the greatest president in history. His legend as the Great Emancipator has grown to mythic proportions as hundreds of books, a national holiday, and a monument in Washington, D.C., extol his heroism and martyrdom. But what if most everything you knew about Lincoln were false? What if, instead of an American hero who sought to free the slaves, Lincoln were in fact a calculating politician who waged the bloodiest war in american history in order to build an empire that rivaled Great Britain’s? In The Real Lincoln, author Thomas J. DiLorenzo uncovers a side of Lincoln not told in many history books and overshadowed by the immense Lincoln legend.
Through extensive research and meticulous documentation, DiLorenzo portrays the sixteenth president as a man who devoted his political career to revolutionizing the American form of government from one that was very limited in scope and highly decentralized—as the Founding Fathers intended—to a highly centralized, activist state. Standing in his way, however, was the South, with its independent states, its resistance to the national government, and its reliance on unfettered free trade. To accomplish his goals, Lincoln subverted the Constitution, trampled states’ rights, and launched a devastating Civil War, whose wounds haunt us still. According to this provacative book, 600,000 American soldiers did not die for the honorable cause of ending slavery but for the dubious agenda of sacrificing the independence of the states to the supremacy of the federal government, which has been tightening its vise grip on our republic to this very day.

You will discover a side of Lincoln that you were probably never taught in school—a side that calls into question the very myths that surround him and helps explain the true origins of a bloody, and perhaps, unnecessary war.

Book Description from Amazon.

Interview with B.R.A.G. Medallion Honoree Annie Daylon

Annie Daylon BRAGI’d like to welcome back Annie Daylon to Layered Pages! Annie is a Newfoundlander, born and raised on the Avalon Peninsula, the main setting for OF SEA AND SEED which is a B.R.A.G. Medallion Honoree.

Annie, after many years teaching, delved wholeheartedly into writing. Her novel Castles in the Sand won the 2012 Houston Writers Guild Novel Contest and received the B.R.A.G. Medallion for excellence in indie publishing. To date, she has penned forty short stories and has won, or been short-listed in, several contests. Annie’s short fiction appears in literary magazines and anthologies in Canada and the United States. She has also recently released a picture book titled The Many-Colored Invisible Hats of Brenda-Louise.

Annie is a member of the Federation of British Columbia Writers and the Writers Alliance of Newfoundland and Labrador. She lives in British Columbia.

Hi, Annie! Thank you for visiting with me today to talk about your latest B.R.A.G. Medallion! First, tell me how you discovered indieBRAG?

Happy to be here! Thanks for the invite!

I discovered indieBRAG on Twitter when another author tweeted that she had received the B.R.A.G. medallion. I followed the indieBRAG link and, impressed with what I read, I submitted my novel, Castles in the Sand, for consideration. Castles in the Sand became a B.R.A.G. medallion honoree. Due to the numerous benefits of indieBRAG—Amazon and Goodreads ratings, tweets, Facebook feature, Pinterest posts, Stickers, and an interview with Layered Pages—I was eager to submit my current release Of Sea and Seed for indieBRAG recognition. I am thrilled to have received the honor a second time.

I must say, I adore your book title and cover. Please tell me a little about your story and the inspiration behind it.

Of Sea and Seed

The Story Of Sea and Seed is set on the island of Newfoundland in the early twentieth century. At its helm is Kathleen Kerrigan, in life a loving wife, mother, grandmother, and storyteller. In the afterlife she is set adrift, doomed for eternity like some ancient mariner to atone for mortal sin by telling repeatedly, in the same order, without hope of altering the outcome, the story of her life. This she does both as watcher and through the eyes of her children, Kevin and Clara.

The Title… Throughout, the sea is a metaphor for Kathleen, the seed is a metaphor for her offspring.

The Inspiration… The story sparked during a phone conversation with my father who remembers the earthquake and ensuing tsunami of 1929. He told me the following: a little girl was on the second floor of her house when the tsunami took that house out to sea. On the returning wave, the ocean planked the house down a few hundred yards from where it was supposed to be. The little girl survived.

I was hooked.
The research began.

Who designed your book cover?

Since Of Sea and Seed has at its core the tsunami that hit the Burin Peninsula of Newfoundland on November 18, 1929, I envisioned an image of the sea for the cover.

When I finished Book I, I realized that each of the three point-of-view characters had experienced a life-or-death situation in a small, traditional fishing boat, called a dory*.

*Wikipedia: The dory is a small, shallow-draft boat, about 5 to 7 metres or 16 to 23 feet long. It is usually a lightweight boat with high sides, a flat bottom and sharp bows. They are easy to build because of their simple lines. For centuries, dories have been used as traditional fishing boats, both in coastal waters and in the open sea.

I hunted through tons of pictures and chose the cover image from Shutterstock (© Andrejs Pidjass .) From there, I worked with the design team at Create Space.
The traditional dory, as depicted on the cover, has a yellow base and dark green gunnels. When I asked the design team to make the green more visible, they reversed the colors, putting the green on the bottom. No can do! Why? The traditional Lunenburg dory is painted yellow on the bottom because the yellow is visible against the water; the gunnels are dark green because that color is visible in fog.  When I explained that to Create Space, they were more than happy to change the design.

Please tell me a little about Clara. What are her strengths and weaknesses?

Of Sea and Seed follows Clara from age six to age twenty-two. Although Clara is limited by the rules of religion and a male-dominated world, she is strong-willed, free-spirited, and adventurous. Her weakness, one which she fights throughout, is her selfishness: she wants her daughter and cannot claim her.

What is the mood or tone your characters portray and how does this affect the story?

One way in which an ominous mood is portrayed is through the use of the Atlantic Ocean as character. (“It begins, and ends, with the sea.”) The residents of the rugged island of Newfoundland are at the beck and call of the sea, which is ever-present, all powerful, and, as stated on page one of the novel, both “matriarch and murderer.”

Of Sea and Seed has three Point of View Characters:

Kathleen (a joy to write, by the way) is poet, storyteller, and historian. She is also victim and conqueror. Although she has no limits of language in the afterlife, she is limited by the way she must tell her story, repeatedly and in the correct order, “like some ancient mariner.” When she says, “Heaven does not open its gates to women of my ilk,” she immediately sets in motion the mood of mystery which pervades the novel.

Clara (Kathleen’s daughter) overcomes the limitations of a church-dominated and male-dominated world. She is a source of optimism, determination, and hope.

Kevin (Kathleen’s son) believes that “the job of a man is take care of his own.” Faced with the devastating loss of his home and family, he rallies, relying on his faith and his surviving child to see him through. An underdog, a diligent worker, a loving father, Kevin represents uncertainty, a life on the cusp.

How long did it take to write your story and where in your home do you like to write?

The story took root in 2009. However, I did not write it immediately. I completed another novel and a children’s book, all the while doing research for Of Sea and Seed.

I like to write at home. In my writing room, there is an armoire which opens to a desk. The beauty of that is, when it’s time to take a break, I close the armoire, lock it, and hang my “Sorry Closed” sign on the door.

Please tell me a little about the period and setting of your story.

The Kerrigan Chronicles are set on the island of Newfoundland in the 1920’s, at a time when Newfoundland was not a part of Canada, but an independent dominion within the British Empire. Although the characters are totally fictional, they are walking through or affected by historical events: the Irish potato famine,
the 1929 tsunami, Prohibition/rum running, all of which are dealt with in Of Sea and Seed.
The next book of the series will deal with World War II. When WW II began, the British Prime Minister Winston Churchill gave territory in Newfoundland to the United States. In return, President Roosevelt gave Great Britain fifty warships. On the land given to them, the U. S. built military bases. One piece of land (and this is true…my father worked there) was the community of Argentia where the fictional Kerrigan family lives. Almost overnight, their homes were burned and bulldozed to make way for a strategic U.S. naval base.

What is an example of the undercurrents of suspense in your story?

This is a tricky question…no spoilers here! But I can say the following:

  1. Hinted at, and unraveled, in Book I is the mystery around the death of Kathleen’s baby, Jimmy.
    2. Hinted at, and unanswered, in Book I is the dubious nature of Clara’s husband, Robert. Is he hiding something? If so, what? (Stay tuned!)

What is your writing schedule like?

My philosophy is Write First and I do that six days a week. I get up around 4 a.m. and, after coffee, crossword, strength-and-stretch exercises, and walking my dog, I set in. My goal is three hours on my work-in-progress. All else—twitter, FB, Goodreads, Blog, business—is relegated to later in the day, as time and energy permit.

Where can readers buy your book?

Of Sea and Seed is available, in print and e-book, at Amazon

A message from indieBRAG:

We are delighted that Stephanie has chosen to Annie Daylon who is the author of, Of Sea and Seed, our medallion honoree at indieBRAG. To be awarded a B.R.A.G. Medallion ®, a book must receive unanimous approval by a group of our readers. It is a daunting hurdle and it serves to reaffirm that a book such as, Of Sea and Seed, merits the investment of a reader’s time and money.

indiebrag team member

 

Cover Crush: A Scream in Soho by John G. Brandon

Cover Crush banner

Erin over at Flashlight Commentary is the one that came up with the cover crush idea and a few of us book bloggers loved it so much that we decided that every Thursday we would post a cover that we really love. Now I must say I haven’t been consistent in my posting cover crush and on the appointed day. Will get there eventually. Posts for my website has been scheduled pretty far out in advance.

Today I am sharing with you a book cover that really stands out to me and I feel gives the right attention to what the book is about. I love how It’s in black and white too! 

A Scream in SohoDescription

A Scream in Soho by John G. Brandon

German bombers are overhead and there is danger the streets of London.

A tall foreigner with strange ‘blind’ looking eyes triggers one of Detective Inspector McCarthy’s infamous ‘hunches’.

Later that night, during the pitch blackness of the wartime blackout, a piercing scream rends the air and Detective Inspector McCarthy is first on the scene to find a bloodied murder weapon, a woman’s lace handkerchief, but no victim to be seen.

As McCarthy attempts to unravel the mystery, the bodies start to pile up, and the whodunit becomes a more complex and colourful story of secret government plans, cross dressing German spies, and murderous dwarves.

McCarthy must move through the dark, seedy Soho underworld – peopled by Italian Gangsters and glamorous Austrian aristocrats alike – not only to find his murderer, but to save Britain’s defences against the Nazi threat.

Set in London during the early days of the Second World War, A Scream in Soho is an evocative and suspenseful London novel from the golden age of British detective fiction.

Check out this week’s cover crush over at 
Flashlight Commentary
2 Kids and Tired Books
A Bookaholic Swede
The Maidens Court

Interview with B.R.A.G. Medallion Honoree G.J. Reilly

Garrith OReilly BRAG II’d like to welcome back B.R.A.G. Medallion Honoree G.J. Reilly to Layered Pages! By day, G. J. Reilly is a teacher of (mostly) ICT and Computing in the South Wales valleys, where he lives with his long-suffering wife and 2.4 cats. 

He has an eclectic selection of hobbies, from playing a number of musical instruments with varying degrees of competence to learning the art of contact juggling and teaching sword-based martial arts. Having gained his degree, he spent ten years working in industry, before deciding to change career and head into education.

With an interest in high fantasy, contemporary fantasy and science fiction from a young age, it comes as no surprise that his first work falls into the young adult contemporary fantasy genre.

Hello, G.J.! Welcome back to Layered Pages. It is a delight to be chatting with you again and congrats on another B.R.A.G. Medallion. Please tell your audience how you discovered indieBRAG and self-publishing in general.

Hi Stephanie and thanks very much for having me again, it’s great to be back.

I decided to follow the self-publishing route mainly because I was completely new to the industry. I’ve been writing on and off since I was young, but ‘Inquisitor’ was the very first full-length manuscript I’d ever produced. When a friend got in touch to tell me that there was an exciting open submission opportunity a few years back, I jumped the gun a little and sent it out unpolished and unrefined. What really surprised me was how long it went un-rejected! Of course, with the huge number other submissions, I finally received my very first ‘no’ and was surprised to find that it was incredibly polite and sincere. That’s when I discovered the indie writing community. But until I joined the Goodreads Kindle User Forum in early 2015, I had no idea how vast that community was. Well, one thing led to another and I soon noticed indieBRAG’s name on my screen time and again.

After looking at the quality of work submitted by other honorees at the time, I didn’t think that ‘Inquisitor’ would stand a chance of being accepted, so I put it out of my mind. Then, sometime during that summer, another writer friend brought indieBRAG up in conversation again and persuaded me to send my details. So I did. Then I forgot all about it again, so that I wouldn’t be too disappointed when it was rejected.

Well, I’m sure I don’t need to tell anyone who’s received that confirmation from Geri how it feels! Now I visit the site every day just to marvel at the company I’m keeping and to check out the blog and read the interviews.

Piper_altTell me about your story, Piper.

‘Piper’ continues the Book of Jerrick story two years from the end of part one. Now a Grand Inquisitor in training (under the watchful eye of the ever-present Mr Catchpole), Tamara learns that Michael is alive and begins to form a plan on how to rescue him from the clutches of the Elder Council.

Meanwhile, having fled from their home at the old Masonic temple, Michael, Anna, and their friends learn that the Flayers – grim, half-dead shadows that lurk in the world between the mirror portals – have been growing in number and that the Piper of legend has returned to settle a score with an old enemy.

When Jerrick is forced to take refuge, things inevitably take a turn for the worst. In his absence, the more militant elders of the Council decide that the time is right to break with their passive traditions and take the war to the Inquisition. Having been ordered to guide a team of would-be assassins back to the academy, events take an even darker turn for Michael, as a heart-wrenching mission becomes a battle for survival.

Please tell me about the new Grand Inquisitor and what is the mood or tone he/she makes and how does this affect the story?

Although Tamara Bloodgood is the new Grand Inquisitor, she is very much the puppet monarch of the Inquisition in Britain until she’s eligible to take up her reign at 16.  In spite of the fact that Tamara’s story seems to take more of a backseat in ‘Piper’, she’s perhaps more important than Michael to the tone of the story.

Tamara’s decisions impact the story from the very first page, bringing the Inquisition closer to open conflict with the Council than we’ve ever seen them. Her intentions are absolutely clear and she even goes as far as brokering a deal with the Piper to achieve her goals. Even when she discovers the truth, Tamara’s still intent on the destruction of the Council once she’s rescued Michael from his ‘captors’.

‘Piper’ takes a very much darker, broodier tone than ‘Inquisitor’, but it’s not all Tamara’s fault. It was intended to reflect the changing moods most of us experience during our teenage years. But I didn’t want it to be the angst-ridden melodrama of some other coming of age stories either. Michael’s rite of passage comes in a single incident, where we can tell the kind of person he’ll be later on, but Tamara’s is drawn out for almost the entire length of the book.

Her attempts to break out from under Catchpole’s shadow only serve to draw unwanted attention from some important people. In a way, her drive to succeed forces the magister’s hand towards the end of the book and leads us into the next part of the story. For me, that’s where the most dramatic change happens. I don’t want to reveal the ending, but I wanted there to be an icy feeling to it that reflects what happens to Tamara. Hopefully, readers will feel the full impact of that change in the next book.

Who is Jerrick and what are his motivations?

Simply, Jerrick is the genie of the lamp. His story is a mishmash of the original ‘nights’ legend and the story of Solomon and the Djin (with a few embellishments). Unfortunately, because of the nature of his imprisonment, he decided long before the beginning of the series that he couldn’t lead the Elder Council any longer and now only serves as an advisor.

His motives for everything from the time we first meet him at the end of ‘Inquisitor’ are driven by guilt. To a certain extent, he was responsible for the beginning of the war and for the creation of the Inquisition. When we next meet him, we learn about his part in the Pied Piper’s tale and why he carries a share of the burden for the missing children of Hamelin.

‘Piper’ reveals a little more of Jerrick’s past, and of how a once compassionate idealist becomes the vengeful trickster of many folktales. He’s is a paradox in that his actions seem to be for the good of the Council and for the people he cares for, but his motivation is his own redemption for past mistakes.

Please share with me something suspenseful in your story.

I’d love to, but rather than hearing about from me, here it is:

“ Michael closed his eyes again, centering on the Inquisitor closest to him. Extending his will, he let it wander until it met the warrior’s defences, feeling an unpleasant tingling in his brain as he came into contact with the barrier. Tracing the line of the wall upwards until the tingling subsided, Michael pushed his mind over the top until he came into contact with the barrier’s caster. The Inquisitor’s head snapped upwards immediately. The sickening renewed tingling broke Michael’s concentration.

Okay, he thought. I can’t attack, but perhaps I can disarm.

Just as he had done time and again, Michael began to draw on his target’s power. He willed it upwards until the ribbon of energy arched over the Inquisitor’s shield and wound towards him. Risking a glance, he was elated to see that his attack had gone unnoticed. He stopped, knowing her suspicions would be raised if she suddenly ran out of power.

Is it possible to do more than one at a time? Michael wondered.

Stretching out again, he began with the woman and spread his attention to the next Inquisitor in the circle. As both streamers rose, Michael felt a noticeable difference in the ease of his endeavour, but it was still manageable, so he moved on to a third. The tricolour of energy felt like a sack of wet sand on Michael’s mind, and when it reached him, the squirming of it made him blanch. His stomach felt like he’d eaten an eight-course meal, and his head spun from the effort of moving so much weight so far.

It’s just like the trials, he reassured himself. If I can move an anvil, I can do this. What did Rupert say: “let’s kick some serious booty,”?

This time, he took a deep breath and let his shoulders drop. Watching through closed eyelids, he drew on the nearest Inquisitor once more, splitting his attentions in both directions. The weight of it was much easier to bear as he directed the ribbons to a space above the centre of the circle and held it there. Extending his will to the next in line, Michael felt a jolt of pressure as he watched the fresh colours mingle with the others.

By the time he had completed the circle, his shoulders were shaking and sweat poured down his face.  He groaned with effort, trying to control the ball of energies that hung in the air above the Inquisitors. Unlike the dull, cold iron of the anvil, the ball felt white hot in Michael’s head, as though he were trying to lasso the sun. It struggled against him, wriggling and twisting in Michael’s mental grasp. At last, he cried out in anguish, shuddering with pain as he let it go.”

(From ‘Piper; The Book of Jerrick – Part 2’; by G. J. Reilly)

What are the mirror portals?

Mirrors have been used in stories for as long as there have been fairy tales; either to see over great distances, tell the future or, most famously, to fuel the jealous rage of wicked queens. But as well as for spying, I use them as doorways that magically interconnect like a vast subway system. The rules for using them are a little complicated, but I hope they’re as realistic as they could be under the circumstances. For example, people can only travel between mirrors they can fit through, so your average car rear-view would be great for putting a hand through to steal something, but no good for travelling from London to Paris. Only highly reflective surfaces can be used for travelling; shop windows are good for spying, but not reflective enough to support a stable connection over long distances. Most importantly, however, the heavier the weight travelling between two destinations, the further apart the portals become, making solo travel almost instant, but group travel a much longer journey.

Will there be another book for this story?

Yes, two in fact: The Cull; The Book of Jerrick Part 3, and the final chapter (no official name as yet). I have outlines for character stories in this universe as well – one for Catchpole and one for Jerrick so far, but I’m planning on a well-earned break in another world before I put pen to paper on those.

Where can readers buy your book?

Readers in the UK, you can get both parts at: Amazon

Readers in the US can visit:
Amazon

Or visit any of the other Amazon stores supporting Kindle worldwide.

Thank you, G. J.!

You’re very welcome, it’s been a pleasure!

Be sure to check out G.J. Reilly’s B.R.A.G. Interview for his book, The Book of Jerrick-Part I here

A message from indieBRAG:

We are delighted that Stephanie has chosen to G.J. Reilly who is the author of, Piper, our medallion honoree at indieBRAG. To be awarded a B.R.A.G. Medallion ®, a book must receive unanimous approval by a group of our readers. It is a daunting hurdle and it serves to reaffirm that a book such as, Piper, merits the investment of a reader’s time and money.

indiebrag team member

Interview with E.M. Powell

03_E.M.-Powell-197x300I’d like to welcome back E.M. Powell to Layered Pages. 

E.M. Powell’s medieval thrillers The Fifth Knight and The Blood of the Fifth Knight have been number-one Amazon bestsellers and on the Bild bestseller list in Germany.

Born into the family of Michael Collins (the legendary revolutionary and founder of the Irish Free State) and raised in the Republic of Ireland, she lives in north-west England with her husband, daughter and a Facebook-friendly dog.

She reviews fiction and non-fiction for the Historical Novel Society, blogs for English Historical Fiction Authors and is a contributing editor to International Thriller Writers’ The Big Thrill magazine.

Hi, E.M.! Thank you for chatting with me today. It is always a pleasure having you visit Layered Pages. Before we start talking about your book, tell me how you got into Historical Fiction and why you chose the 12 century as your period?

Hi Stephanie and a pleasure to chat with you as always!

As for how I got into Historical Fiction, I’m probably the same as many writers of it— I read it first. I loved some of Jean Plaidy’s novels when I was younger. I was also a fan of crime novels. The jackpot for me was when I first read Agatha Christie’s Death Comes as the End, her standalone historical mystery set in Ancient Egypt, which combined both of my favorite genres.  As for writing, my first attempt at a novel was a 120,000 page contemporary thriller with romantic elements, quite rightly rejected by agents and publishers many, many times. I needed to learn my craft.  In the process, I shifted from contemporary to historical because I loved historical worlds and I could expand my creative horizons.

I chose the 12th century because one of history’s most infamous murders, the murder of Archbishop Thomas Becket in Canterbury Cathedral, took place in 1170. That murder was the premise for my first published novel, my historical thriller, The Fifth Knight, which features my fictional hero, Sir Benedict Palmer.

02_The-Lord-of-Ireland

Please tell me the premise of your story.

My latest release is book #3 in the Fifth Knight series, The Lord of Ireland. Palmer is called back into the service of his king, Henry II, once again.

Henry first arrived in Ireland in 1171. He had already sent troops there and he wanted to stamp his authority on it. But by 1185 it was in a state of major unrest, with native Irish kings and Henry’s Anglo-Norman barons who had taken Irish lands fighting it out for power. The King had an ingenious solution: make his eighteen year old son Lord of Ireland and send him over to sort it out. And that son was John. Yes—the John who would one day be Bad King John. Unknown to John, Henry has also sent his right-hand man, Palmer, to root out the traitors he fears are working to steal the land from him.

But Palmer is horrified when John disregards Henry’s orders and embarks on a campaign of bloodshed that could destroy the kingdom. Now Palmer has to battle the increasingly powerful Lord of Ireland. Power, in John’s hands, is a murderous force—and he is only just beginning to wield it.

What do you think of Prince John? He is an Historical figure people love to loath!

It says something about a British Royal when even Disney has a pop at them. John’s portrayal as a thumb-sucking lion prince in the classic animation Robin Hood is only one of many unflattering renditions of him.

Trouble is, they aren’t far off the mark. John acquired his terrible reputation by simply being John. Suffice to say, his campaign in Ireland was a disaster—a gift to me as a novelist. A further gift was that the King’s clerk, Gerald of Wales, went with John, leaving us many first-hand accounts of what went on.

John’s first act was to insult the Irish. A group of powerful Irish chieftains came to pay tribute to him as Henry’s representative, greeting him as their lord. John’s response? Well, according to Gerald, John ‘pulled some of them about by their beards, which were large and flowing according to the native custom.’ Suitably angered and very unimpressed, the Irish made for the court of one of the Irish kings, where they reported back on the insults and how John was ‘a mere youth…a stripling who only listened to youthful advice.’ Worse, they decided that rather than make peace with John, they would ‘plot to resist [John’s force]…guard the privileges of their ancient freedom’ with their lives, and ‘make pacts’ to resist him. Oh, John.

Meanwhile, John began making grants of land to his own friends— land that loyal supporters of Henry already held. The result, according to Gerald, was that those who were dispossessed ‘went over to the side of the enemy.’ There were losses of life on both sides. John (or rather, his more able men) made a few gains, but his forces were well and truly routed in equal amounts by some of the native Irish kings. His less able men drank, caroused and fought with each other. When John failed to pay them, they deserted.

One would have thought that John would have accepted some responsibility for his failings. But no. Instead, he went back to England and Henry, accusing one of Henry’s men of treacherous dealings with the Irish. That man was the Anglo-Norman Hugh de Lacy, Henry’s first Lord of Meath.

For those of who do not know what Anglo-Norman is, will you explain?

‘Anglo-Norman’ can mean the dialect of the Normans as used in England after the Norman Conquest of 1066. The ‘Anglo-Normans’ in the context of Irish history refers to those invaders/settlers who arrived in 1169 and after at the behest of Henry II and an Irish king, Diarmait Mac Murchada (Dermot MacMurrough). As well as ‘Anglo-Norman’, the incomers can be/have been described as Norman, Cambro‐Norman (those who came from Wales, such as the family of Gerald of Wales) and Anglo‐French. Contemporary Irish sources invariably described them as Saxain— the English.

What are the emotional triggers of your characters and how do they act on them?

Character development forms the backbone of a novel. Without it, you simply have Things Happening and no-one cares very much, no matter how high stakes those events are. I like to write character bios for all my main characters. That way, I know who those characters are and what drives them. It can be love, greed, ambition, loss, fear and whatever mix is needed.

What are your thoughts of Henry II?

Henry was a complex man, with huge energy and drive. There are terrible events that can be laid at his door, like Becket’s murder. His involvement in Ireland in the 12th century certainly had enormous and tragic implications for my homeland. But there is also much to admire about him. His reorganization of the judicial system, for instance, stands out. His Assize of Clarendon in 1166 established procedures of criminal justice, with courts and prisons for those awaiting trial with speedy and clear verdicts.

What’s up next for you?

I can’t say too much at the moment. I can however give a quite a large hint—Henry II’s criminal courts, anyone?

In your bio it says that you were born in the family of Michael Collins (the legendary revolutionary and founder of the Irish Free State). And recently I read a book where it touches on this subject in the early 20th century. I was really fascinated by it. Have you or will you write any stories that are inspired by those events?

Michael Collins was my great-grandmother’s brother. I am hugely proud to have such an important and influential figure in my family tree. As for writing about him, I hesitate to say never, but it’s not likely.

How much time do you spend writing and researching? What is the most rewarding thing to you about writing?

My working days as a writer are usually 10 – 12 hours long. Researching a historical novel, in my experience, takes about a third of the total time it takes to produce a 100,000 word book. Out of that time also has to come time for marketing, which I would estimate to be about half my working week. I don’t think those numbers would come as a surprise to any other historical novelist. As for rewarding, nothing beats a glowing review or a lovely e-mail from a reader. I’m so privileged to have had many of those—and the glow never wears off!

What do you hope reader come away with your stories?

I hope readers have been transported to another time and place and that they’re sorry to have left the characters behind. It’s also a bonus when somebody says they have been interested enough to afterwards delve into the real history.

Thank you, E.M.! Please come back to Layered Pages again! It was great chatting with you.

And you, Stephanie- I look forward to it! Thanks so much for hosting me.

AMAZON US | AMAZON UK | BARNES & NOBLE | BOOK DEPOSITORY |CHAPTERS

Find more information at E.M. Powell’s website and blog. You can also find her on FacebookTwitter, and Goodreads.