Book Spotlight: Blitz Pams by John Orton

Blitz PAMs bragB.R.A.G. Medallion Honoree

Synopsis

Britain in September 1940 has seen the retreat from Dunkirk, and the entry of Italy into the War. The RAF has withstood all that the Luftwaffe could throw at it in the Battle of Britain, but the German Blitzkrieg is just starting. The first bombing raids have hit South Shields and the town prepares for worse to come.

The Police need younger PAMs (Police Auxiliary Messengers) to be ready to take messages on their bikes in the event of a raid and if the phone lines are down. Mossie Hamed, grocery delivery boy, is one of the volunteers who become the Blitz PAMs. Although, in his own words ‘not ower clever’, Mossie tells how the next eighteen months change the lives of him and his ‘marras’ and of the many other unsung heroes on the home front.

“Blitz Pams tells with astonishing vividness and compelling verve a story from a forgotten world – a North Eastern town during the Blitz. John Orton makes this lost world real again. Through the voice of the narrator, he succeeds in recreating the life and struggles of young people in conditions where they could feel they were making a difference. Anyone who wants a fresh look into what it means to live in a time of crisis will enjoy this arrestingly well written book.”

John Gray – (Author of ‘Straw Dogs: thoughts on humans and other animals’)

About Author

John Orton II

John was born in 1949 in South Shields, England and after reading Law at Oxford University followed a career as a Solicitor in local Government.

Married with three children John, now retired, lives in Portishead, near Bristol where he divides his time between writing, playing old style piano and gardening.

Tracing his family history led John into a growing interest into the social history of his home town, South Shields – he now enjoys writing ‘faction’ – ficiton based on fact – in his series ‘Tales from Old South Shields.’

John’s first book ‘The Five Stone Steps’ is also a BRAG Medallion winner.

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Interview with Award Winning Author Alison Brodie

Author photo

I’d like to welcome Award Winning Author Alison Brodie to Layered Pages! Alison is a Scot, with French Huguenot ancestors on her mother’s side.

Brodie is an international, best-selling author.  Her books have been published by Hodder & Stoughton (UK), Heyne (Germany) and Unieboek (Holland). 

Hi, Alison! Tell me how you discovered indieBRAG?

It’s hard to miss!  I regularly see the BRAG Awards everywhere on social media: writing blogs for indie writers, and highly-acclaimed books with the BRAG medallion on their covers, etc.

What is your book about?

Brake Failure

Brake Failure is about Ruby, an English debutante who ends up in Kansas City.  Far from home, she transforms from Miss-Perfectly-Correct to criminally insane as she breaks the bonds of her rigid upbringing.  Sheriff Hank Gephart tries to reel her in but she’s out of control and she ain’t hitting the brakes.

Who are your secondary characters in your book?

Ruby’s snobbish step-sister, Claire, who continually belittles Ruby.  Rowdy the stray mongrel.  Idabel, a Survivalist, who teaches Ruby how to shoot a gun and dig a man trap.

Do you take personality traits from real people and use them for your characters?

No.  My characters come into my head fully formed.

Why did you choose to write your story leading up to the Y2K Meltdown?

Because it was fascinating!  This was something that had never happened before in history.  I lived through Y2K in Shawnee Mission, Kansas.  Television reports veered from “Just stock up as if for a tornado” to “run for the hills!!”

Nobody knew what was going to happen when the date on computers changed to four zeroes.  The US government had a command center and spent $150 billion on preparing for Armageddon.  I’m surprised nobody has written about this time in American history.

Why did you choose the romance genre to write in?

I like to write what I, myself, would choose to read.  And I always like a little romance.

Which character in your story are you particular to?

Idabel, the tough Survivalist, who is preparing to battle against hordes of ravaging looters.  When Ruby gives Idabel a box of blonde hair-colorant and cherry lip-gloss, Idabel stares at them wordlessly.  Then she says: “Well, if we don’t survive, we’ll die real pretty.”

How long did it take you to write this story and what was your process?

Off and on for a fifteen year.  I made notes before and during Y2K.  When I got back to England I wrote the skeleton of the story and forgot about it.  I finally wrote it a couple of years ago.  (Sometimes it’s better to write a story long after an event because the things you remember are usually the sharpest, and most interesting.

Where can readers buy your book?

Brake Failure is on Amazon kindle.  I hope to be publishing all my books in paperback by the end of the year.

What is up next for you?

I’m releasing ZENKA on 6 Nov.  Here’s my first review:  “Top of my list for best fiction this year” –Lauren Sapala, WriteCity.

ZENKA is not a romcom.  It is a darkly comic crime thriller/suspense with a hint of romance.  Zenka is a Hungarian pole-dancer, capricious, devious and loyal.  When London mob boss, Jack Murray, saves her life she vows to become his guardian angel – whether he likes it or not.  With shocking consequences.

Is there a message you would like to give to your readers?

I never start my books with a BANG!  I build slowly at first, then gather speed – faster and faster – while injecting twists and turns, until that rug-pulling moment.  I usually have multi-strands in my stories so I make sure that these strands all come together in the end, like someone pulling tight the purse-strings of a pouch.

News Press:

Reviews for her debut, FACE TO FACE: “Fun to snuggle up with” –GOOD HOUSEKEEPING Pick of the Paperbacks.  “Vane but wildly funny leading lady” -Scottish Daily Mail.

Brodie has now gone “indie”.  Here are some editorial reviews for her recent books. 

BRAKE FAILURE: “Masterpiece of humor” -Midwest Book Review

THE DOUBLE: “Proof of her genius in writing fiction” -San Francisco Book Review.

ZENKA  (to be released 6 Nov, 2017): “ZENKA is top of my list for best fiction this year.  If Tina Fey and Simon Pegg got together to write a dark and hilarious mobster story with a happy ending, ZENKA would be the result.”  -Lauren Sapala, WriteCity

Book Links:

Brake Failure – BUY LINKS

Amazon USA

Amazon Uk

Amazon CA

Author Link:

Twitter

Website

Goodreads

Facebook

We are delighted that Stephanie has chosen to interview Alison Brodie who is the author of, Brake Failure, our medallion honoree at indieBRAG. To be awarded a B.R.A.G. Medallion ®, a book must receive unanimous approval by a group of our readers. It is a daunting hurdle and it serves to reaffirm that a book such as, A Dog for Leo, merits the investment of a reader’s time and money.

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Interview with Award Winning Author Lis Anna-Langston

Lis Anna-Langston

I’d like to welcome Award Winning Author Lis Anna-Langston to Layered Pages. Lis is a Parents’ Choice Gold Book Award winner, a Moonbeam Children’s Book Award winner and the Dante Rossetti First Place Award winner for YA Fiction. She is the author of Tupelo Honey, Skinny Dipping in a Dirty Pond and the short story collection, Tolstoy & the Checkout Girl. Born in the South she loves writing about misfits, screw ups, outlaws and people who generally don’t fit into nicely labeled boxes. She loves zany, wild rides and is the recipient of many awards including; a two-time Pushcart nominee, a five-time WorldFest winner, Telluride IndieFest winner, Helene Wurlitzer Grant recipient, New Century Writers winner, a finalist in the prestigious William Faulkner Competition, & Second Place Winner of the Thomas Wolfe Fiction Award. She writes Young Adult, New Adult and Middle Grade novels and loves every second of it.

Lis, please tell me how you discovered indieBRAG.

I have entered many contests in my career but this is the first book I’ve had go to print. So, I created a list of book award contests and entered. Parents’ Choice, Moonbeam, Literary Classics and IndieBRAG were all on the list and I entered and won each one.

Tell me about your book, Tupelo Honey.

Tupelo Honey

Well, each person sees the book slightly differently. I think this story is about a little girl trying to manage the insanity of her family. I really loved Teresa DiFalco’s review from Parents’ Choice Awards. I think she summed it up so well:

Tupelo Honey is a delight. Set in rural Mississippi, with a cast of colorful southerners, it stars one pretty dysfunctional family at the center of which is Tupelo Honey. Author Lis Anna-Langston gets into the head of her title girl completely, taking readers on a ride of a sort of haunted but beautiful mess. To paraphrase Tolstoy, it’s the unhappy families that are unique — and by definition, often more interesting. Tupelo Honey does not have an easy life, on the surface. Her mother is a drug addict, and mental illness lingers in her grandmother Marmalade’s house like a hot humid August cloud. Yet Anna-Langston still fills it with gems. It’s certainly not a dull life, one full of heartbreaks big and small, but this tough sweet girl pulls it off with aplomb. It’s a treat from start to end. Langston has written rich, vivid characters, and painted a vibrant mosaic of a year in one young southern girl’s life. It’s a hard book to put down, and one you won’t want to end. I envy its future readers.”

What was the inspiration for your story?

A lot of this story came from a creative memoir class I took in North Carolina. It was one of the first writing classes I’d ever taken. I studied literature in college but I did not take writing classes. So, I wrote to the class prompts. My classmates loved these stories so I kept writing and they made me promise I’d complete the book. At some point, I decided to add in fictional scenes or change the chronology of events and at that point I switched it to fiction.  Those classes were hard and honestly, I wanted to quit. My roommate said, “That’s exactly why you should keep taking the class.” She was right. My inspiration came from hearing the stories of my classmates and organizing the material I created every day.

Set the scene for Northern Mississippi in your story.

Well, I grew up in North Mississippi. It was an amazing place with staggering poverty at the time. The light slants low over the earth in Mississippi in the late summer in a way I’ve never witnessed anywhere else. It is a land of triumph and simplicity, a place where people knew their neighbors and talked to each other. Even back in the 90’s they still had party lines in Mississippi. For some reason, I thought that was awesome. They weren’t racing to catch up with technology. It is also partly set in Mexico City which is my favorite city on Earth.

What are Tupelo’s strengths and weaknesses?

I think her strength is her weakness to some degree. She is a little girl who can survive anything but she has to get to the point where she steps out of that circle and begins to thrive. Her strength is her ability to love and constantly find the good in people. She is incredibly resilient and likeable. Her weaknesses really come from outside of her in the form of her mother’s addictions.

How long did it take to write your story and what was your process?

This book is comprised of sections cut from another book. I wrote a book entitled Skinny Dipping in a Dirty Pond. That book was four hundred pages long and geared more to adults. That book was optioned and turned into a screenplay. In the process of rewriting the book and creating the screenplay a lot was cut, changed, enriched, deepened. It left me with a lot of excess material. One day I compiled all the cut sections and chapters and realized it had a real theme and plot. What had been cut was similar in tone and rising action. So, from the cutting room floor Tupelo Honey began to rise. The actual book took me about three or four weeks to rewrite and put together from that point.

Who designed your book cover?

Me. I designed the cover. Photography and design are skills I’ve possessed for a long time. I had an idea of what I wanted it to look like and kept searching and creating drafts. Finally, I put together the cover and paid a graphic design artist in Africa to do the layout on the back.

Where can readers buy your book?

Tupelo Honey is available on Amazon, Barnes & Noble, iBooks, Kobo, and it is available for instant purchase via Kindle and Nook.

Amazon

Barnes & Noble

itunes

Kobo

What is up next for you?

A grand adventure with the new middle grade and YA books I’ve just finished. These books are particularly electric and filled with great energy and excitement. My agent is shopping them around now. I’m involved in a few film projects. I’m always working on about five projects at a time. Just about everything I create is for a middle grade or young adult audience.

Is there a message you would like to give to your readers?

I LOVE writing for YOU! I love, love, love it. I love entertaining people and bringing laughs and tears into a reader’s life. Okay, the good kinda tears. 🙂 I love it when I am totally swept up in a story, when the world quietly slips away. I aim to accomplish this with my readers. Readers are the lifeblood of the publishing world.

Author Website

Tupelo Honey MemeMore about Lis:

Her fiction has been published in Word Riot, The Blotter, Petigru Review, Hot Metal Press, The Smoking Poet, Eclectic Flash Literary Journal, Paper Skin Glass Bones, 491 Magazine, Fiction Fix, The Monarch Review, 5×5 Literary Magazine, Red Booth Review, Hint Fiction Anthology, Chamber Four Literary Magazine, Emyrs Journal, Literary Laundry, Barely South Review, Flash Fiction Offensive, Flashquake Literary Journal, Steel Toe Review, Cactus Heart Press, Empty Sink Publishing, Prick of the Spindle Literary Review, Per Contra, Storyacious, Gravel Literary, Bedlam Publishing, New Plains Review, The Merrimack Review, Vine Leaves Literary Journal, Kaaterskill Basin Journal, Sand Hill Review, Conclave. Milk Journal and The MacGuffin Literary Review.

A message from indieBRAG:

We are delighted that Stephanie has chosen to interview Lis Anna-Langston who is the author of, Tupelo Honey, our medallion honoree at indieBRAG. To be awarded a B.R.A.G. Medallion ®, a book must receive unanimous approval by a group of our readers. It is a daunting hurdle and it serves to reaffirm that a book such as, Tupelo Honey, merits the investment of a reader’s time and money.

indiebrag-team-member

 

Bookish Happenings: New Books & Cover Contest Summary

In the last two weeks, I’ve done more reading than I have in a long while. I must admit, I am proud of myself and hope to keep up the pace. Yesterday, I told my friends I might be biting off more than I can chew this week with my reading goal. I aim to read 1,087 pages of material (four books). I really need to get this done but so far, I’ve only read close to four hundred pages. I won’t let that get me down and I plan to keep a positive attitude that I can meet my goal.

There are three books I recently acquired on NetGalley and I would like to get to those by the end of this month: Everything Here is Beautiful by Mira T. Lee, Points North by Howard Frank Mosher and Unraveling Oliver by Liz Nugent. All three books are ARC’s (Advance Readers Copy).

**********

The last two months have been a lot of fun for indieBRAG and its Honorees. indieBRAG held their 2017 Cover Contest and had a great turn out of votes. Johnny Big Ears by John Paul Padilla is the overall winner of the contest. I big congratulation to him and the designer of his cover. There will be a few featured posts of his book and himself coming up soon. Be sure to be on the lookout for it!

indieBRAG Winner of the 2017 Cover Contest

I would also like to take this opportunity and congratulate the genre/categories winners. They are as follow:

Darkshine by R.D. Vallier

The Little Firefly by Sheri Fink

The Time Travel Trailer by Karen Musser Nortman

The Fantasmagorical Forest by S.L. Dwyer

The Shoes Come First by Janet Leigh

In the Shadow of the Storm by Anna Belfrage

Dog Water Free by Michael Jay

Chasing the Star Garden by Melanie Karsak

In the Mind of Revenge by Liv Hadden

Of Sea and Seed by Annie Daylon

*Be sure to click on each title to find out more about the book and author!

Thank you for visiting Layered Pages today!

Stephanie M. Hopkins

Interview with Award Winning Author Joan Fallon

Joan Fallon BRAG

I’d like to welcome Award Winning B.R.A.G. Medallion Honoree Joan Fallon today. Joan was born in Dumfries, Scotland but spent most of her adult life in England. Teacher, management trainer and business woman, she moved to Spain at the beginning of the new millennium and became a writer. Her first published work was a social history, ‘Daughters of Spain’, inspired by the women she met in her adopted home. Her subsequent books too have grown out of her experiences living and working in Spain. She is especially interested in Spanish history and has set her novels in periods as distinct as the Golden Age of the Moorish conquest and the Spanish Civil War.  She is a member of the Society of Authors and the Alliance of Independent Authors.

 Hi, Joan! Thank you for visiting with me today. Please tell me how you discovered indieBRAG.

 Well actually it was Helen Hollick, the lady who set up Discovering Diamonds, who recommended IndieBRAG to me. I first got to know her when she was working for the Historical Novel Review Society a few years ago.

I love your book cover! Tell me about your story, The Shining City.

THE SHINING CITY BRAG

The novel is set in southern Spain in the mid tenth century. The country is ruled by al-Rahman III, who is celebrating the fact that he has just pronounced himself caliph of al-Andalus by building a new palace/city, Madinat al-Zahra. Many of his subjects have flocked to this new city looking for work and among them is a potter called Qasim and his family. Qasim is running away from his past and hoping to build a new future in Madinat al-Zahra, where he has taken on a new identity. Even his sons do not know his history.

The woman on the cover of the books is supposed to represent one of the leading characters in the novel. She is Jawhara, one of the caliph’s concubines. She was originally from Saxony and was captured by Viking raiders and sold as a slave to the caliph of al-Andalus. She is very beautiful and one day she is spotted by Omar, the youngest son of Qasim the potter. He falls desperately in love with her and becomes obsessed with seeing her even though he knows it is forbidden on pain of death.

One night he breaks into the harem to meet her but it does not go well. His father is horrified at what he has done and the consequences for everyone are severe. I can’t tell you any more without spoiling the story for you.

What fascinates you most about the period in history you have written about?

As you know, I live in southern Spain and over the years I have become fascinated with the country and its history. The Moors lived in Spain for 700 years and their influence is everywhere – in the architecture, the language, the food and the culture. So naturally I was drawn to learning more about them. I chose the tenth century because it was the Moors Golden Age. Never before nor after, did the country have such a reputation for wealth, culture and learning, nor was it so egalitarian. It was the most educated country in the western world and people flocked from all parts of Europe to its universities and libraries.

Tell me a little about Qasim. Was he a real person in history or fictional? What are his strengths and weaknesses?

No, Qasim isn’t a real character but he is based on real people. For example, the past he is hiding is based on a real man called Omar ibn Hafsun, one of the rebels who fought against al-Rahman III. Qasim is a potter who moved to Madinat al-Zahra, as many other artisans and workmen did at the time. The caliph encouraged people to move out of Córdoba and settle in Madinat al-Zahra by offering them the money to build a house. It was an offer too good to miss and thousands of people moved to the new city. So, I made Qasim one of them.

Qasim’s strengths lie in his strong religious beliefs and his love for his family. He is a man of honour. He treats his wife as an equal – almost. His weaknesses are that he is not flexible enough when faced with his son’s mistake.

Describe the city for me.

Madinat al-Zahra is in ruins now. But it is believed to have been a wonderful place with street lighting, paved roads, running water and public bath houses. I think the best way I can describe it to you is to let Omar tell you what he related to his nephew when he was an old man:

‘Our ruler, Abd al-Rahman III, wanted to build a city-palace worthy of the title of Khalifa so he sent his engineers and architects out to find the perfect location.  And they did.  They found a spot in the foothills of the Sierra Moreno, green, fertile, sheltered from the north winds, with as much water as you could wish for, yet set high enough above the plain so that you would be able to see anyone approaching.  From there you could see across the valley of the Guadalquivir to Córdoba and beyond.’

‘It was indeed the Shining City.  When visitors entered through the Grand Portico, passing beneath its enormous, red and white arches, when they climbed the ramped streets that were paved with blocks of dark mountain stone, passing the lines of uniformed guards in their scarlet jackets and the richly robed civil servants that flanked their way, when they reached the royal residence and saw the golden inlay on the ceilings, the marble pillars, the richly woven rugs scattered across the floors and the brilliant silk tapestries, when they saw the moving tank of mercury in the great reception pavilion that caught the sunlight and dazzled all who beheld it, then they indeed knew that they were in the Shining City.’

How did you come to write this story?

Back in the year 2000 I went to an exhibition in Madinat al-Zahra. I knew nothing about the place before that and I was fascinated by its history, and particularly by the fact that the city lasted no more than 75 years. I knew that one day I would write a story about it.

What is a tradition the people have in this civilization?

At that time Moorish civilisation was far more advanced than the rest of Europe. The majority of people were educated, including women. Women were allowed to work, to go to universities, to own property, to have careers such a doctors and scribes.

It was a multi-religious society. The ruling class were of course Muslims, but both Christians and Jews were allowed to worship their own faith, pursue careers in government and live their own lives. They were not however allowed to try to convert any Muslims to their faith. It was a society that also relied on slaves – but the slaves were non-believers. If a slave converted to Islam he regained his freedom.

Who designed your book cover?

A delightful woman called Rachel Lawston of Lawston Designs. She has designed a number of covers for me now and has a knack for getting just the right feel for the book (without having read it!)

Where can readers buy your book?

The Shining City is the first book in The al-Andalus series. All the books in the series are available on Amazon, from Barnes and Noble and other bookshops, both on-line and in the High Street.

Is there a message you would like to give to your readers?

Only this. Whether you prefer to read ebooks or paperbacks, never stop reading and encourage any children in your lives to read as much as they can. I worry that people are drifting away from the written word now that there are so many alternatives available to them. I’d like young people to realise that there is nothing so satisfying as reading a good book and becoming completely engrossed in the characters and the story.

Thank you, Joan!

Thank you, Stephanie, for inviting me to talk to you.

other links: Facebook

Website

Twitter

Facebook Author Page

A message from indieBRAG:

We are delighted that Stephanie has chosen to interview Joan Fallon who is the author of, THE GOLDEN CITY, our medallion honoree at indieBRAG. To be awarded a B.R.A.G. Medallion ®, a book must receive unanimous approval by a group of our readers. It is a daunting hurdle and it serves to reaffirm that a book such as, THE GOLDEN CITY, merits the investment of a reader’s time and money.

indiebrag-team-member

 

 

Interview with Award Winning Author Jim Andersen

Jim Andersen BRAG

I’d like to welcome B.R.A.G. Medallion Honoree Author Jim Andersen to Layered Pages today. Shortly after the walk Jim quit his job at the paper mill and moved to Austin, Nevada where he lived for 32 years. While in Austin–chronicled in his first book ‘Lost in Austin’ (University of Nevada Press, 2009)–he worked various jobs, finally settling into positions of deputy sheriff for eleven years and Justice of the Peace for twelve. Jim is currently retired and living in Pahrump, Nevada, with his wife of 30 years, Val. He has one daughter, two stepsons and a cat.

Thank you for talking with me today, Jim. How did you discover indieBRAG?

Purely by chance.  I was looking into ways I might promote the book and just came across indieBrag on one of the searches.  It looked and sounded professional, and their function was clearly stated, short and to the point, all of which appealed to me.

How has your self-publishing journey been thus far?

Swift.  My other book was published by a University Press and took three years from the time it was accepted to the day it was printed.  I mean we’re burnin’ daylight here, and none of us know how much daylight we’ve got left to burn so that’s certainly a consideration.  The other thing I liked was the latitude I was given.  I really did have the final say on everything from the cover design to the punctuation.  The only thing I would have changed would be the photos accompanying the text.  For some reason, I thought the publisher would edit them a little as to focus and lighting.  However, I had total control over that too even though I wasn’t aware of it, so it wasn’t their fault.  The pictures are acceptable, they just aren’t as grabbing as they could have been.

Please tell me about your book, Sometimes a Great Notion…Isn’t, so much.

Sometimes a Great Notion

The ‘Great Notion’ was to get listed in the Guinness Book of World Records, a fad that swept the nation in the manner of the ‘pet rock’ craze or the Macarena dance.  In the late sixties, everybody was talking about the record book and trying to find some way to get listed.  I came up with the idea of walking from 14,496′ Mt. Whitney to Death Valley’s Badwater, at 282 feet below sea level; until Alaska joined the Union in 1959 those were the highest and lowest points in the entire United States.  My book documents the seven-day 143-mile trek I and three of my friends made, with the help of a support party and a lot of moleskin.

Would you undertake a challenge like that again?

Not likely.

What is one of the high points of this journey?

Mt. Whitney.  (Sorry, couldn’t help myself.)  I suppose the high point would be early in the walk, on the second day from Whitney.  We’d hiked a bit off course to get to a phone booth located in the old town of Keeler, where I called home and my stepdaughter told me the Oakland Tribune newspaper had run a Sunday article on our trip.  It was from an interview done a couple weeks earlier and contained our picture and these final words which I still know by heart because they made such an impression on us; “If all goes well, four figures dressed in ghostly white will emerge from the shimmering desert near Badwater in eight to ten days.”  Any thoughts of quitting that might have been skittering around the corners of our thoughts were expunged by that beckoning vision, at least for the time being.

Describe Death Valley.  

It’s well-named.  The summer heat out there itself holds a world record in the Guinness book–134° logged on July 10, 1913.  A person can’t function very long, if at all, in that kind of heat.   We didn’t measure the air temperature on our walk, but we did take a reading of the ground temperature with a meat thermometer in Panamint Valley and it was 165° just before noon.  I would say the heat we encountered was just short of debilitating in Death Valley, even at night.  And the walking surface out there was the worst on the trip–jagged rocks and salt pinnacles.  If you’re already beat half to death, it’s a bad place to put yourself.

Did you and your friends meet others along the way and what was that like?

We met very few people once we hit the Mojave Desert.  And outside of a ranger on Mt. Whitney, I don’t recall talking to anybody except a few drivers while we were walking the roads. They kept offering us a lift.  You have no idea how hard that was to turn down.   Our campsites we just set up whenever we got too tired to walk.  We’d scouted the route and had several wide spots scoped out and we even used one or two of them.  Nobody ever came around our camps.

What was your learning experience while writing this story?

Well I intended to keep a daily journal the entire trip so I wouldn’t have to trust to memory, but that sort of went by the wayside after a couple days, when the focus somehow shifted from keeping a record to just keeping upright, period.  So, I did have to trust to memory which can be a little scary if you’re really concerned with getting the right happenings in the right order.  I am sure of the book’s overall accuracy but I wouldn’t want to swear to the details.  You just have to recall things the best you can and get on to the next page.  So, I learned you should keep good notes if you intend to write about some event in particular.

Do you have any new writing projects in the works?

Not at the moment.  My wife and I are in the process of moving to a new house in Nevada so I’m just too busy.  There.  That’s my story and I’m stickin’ to it.

Where can readers buy your book?

Amazon is about the only place at this time, but we hope to place them in both Mt. Whitney’s lodge and the visitor’s center at Furnace Creek.  Hopefully, this interview may even help with that stuff.

Thank you, Jim!

To purchase this book, click HERE to the Amazon links.

A message from indieBRAG:

We are delighted that Stephanie has chosen to interview Jim Andersen who is the author of, Sometimes a Great Notion…Isn’t, so much, our medallion honoree at indieBRAG. To be awarded a B.R.A.G. Medallion ®, a book must receive unanimous approval by a group of our readers. It is a daunting hurdle and it serves to reaffirm that a book such as, Sometimes a Great Notion…Isn’t, so much, merits the investment of a reader’s time and money.

indiebrag-team-member

 

 

Interview with Award Winning Author Molly Greene

MollyGreeneHeadshot2

I’d like to welcome Award Winning Author Molly Greene to Layered Pages today. Molly writes the Gen Delacourt Mystery Series, which includes Mark of the Loon, The Last Fairytale, Paint Me Gone, A Thousand Tombs, Swindle Town, Lock the Cellar Door, Midnight at Half Moon Bay, The India Archives, and, out soon, Burn Rubber. For freebies, giveaways, and news about upcoming releases, join her Reader’s Club.

Thank you for talking with me today, Molly. Tell me how you discovered indieBRAG?

Hello Stephanie, it’s a pleasure to join you, thanks so much for the opportunity to talk about myself and my books! I heard about the indieBRAG program through my friend Virginia King, author and fellow B.R.A.G. Medallion Honoree. Virginia is a staunch supporter of the program, and suggested I apply when I inquired about the Medallion on her book’s cover. I’m thrilled to have been chosen.

Please tell me a little about the premise of your book.

Mark of the Loon

Mark of the Loon is about a single, semi-isolated, thirty-something female real estate agent who falls in love with a cottage, side-steps a potential relationship and several obstacles to buy it, then slowly discovers that the house is so much more than it appears to be on the surface. As she and college friend Gen Delacourt unravel the mysteries attached to the property, she examines her personal issues and (better late than never) embarks on a new chapter of her life. Every title in my Gen Delacourt series involves a mystery, but also reveals some level of personal growth on the part of the characters.

Tell me a little about Madison and her strengths and weaknesses.

Madison is strong, disciplined, knowledgeable, and resourceful, but afraid of getting too close to a man. She has great relationships with smart, supportive, funny women. She does what she says she will do. She’s not afraid of taking risks, unless that risk involves her heart.

What is some of the history that surrounds this story?

The plot involves WWII, an Irish spy, Nazi looting, and Hitler’s plan to destroy the economics of the US and the UK by flooding the market with counterfeit bills.

How did you come to write this story and how many books will be in this series?

I’m an avid reader of mysteries and I love great writing, but over the years I grew tired of all the graphic gore and serial killers and child predators and unnecessary sex that so many authors depend on. So I set out to write a book that did not incorporate those things. The plot grew in my mind while my dog and I were on our daily walks, something I still rely on to hash things out as I’m writing.

Since then, I’ve grown the series to include eight titles with plots that avoid all the above-mentioned elements. I’m planning at least twelve Gen Delacourt Mysteries, then I’ll write a few standalones and/or another series that spin off a couple of Gen’s secondary characters I’ve grown to love.

What is the easiest and most difficult part of writing a series?

The most fabulous part by far is getting to know and understand characters so well that I know exactly what they’ll say and how they’ll react in most situations. It’s like having invisible friends! The challenging part, especially since I avoid many typical plot situations (sex, cursing, gore) is coming up with plausible cases and situations for my characters to react to. So far I’ve had great good fortune making this happen. I have two future book ideas in my head, and I also keep a file of real-life articles about weird and wacky stuff that might prove interesting for future story lines and characters.

How long did it take for you to write your story and what was your process?

I began LOON in 2009 when I was working full time, and it took a year to complete the first rough draft. A dozen full-book edits later it was published in 2012, then I edited the manuscript again in 2013. From 2014-2015 I wrote like a madwoman, publishing four more titles, then slowed a bit. Eight are available at this writing. My goal now is to publish two new titles a year.

Where can readers buy your book?

Amazon, of course, and other major online booksellers.

When did you first know you wanted to be a writer?

I have a marketing background and have always done a lot of business-related writing. I wrote narrative poetry when I was in high school. I never planned to be a writer of fiction; not until I sent Mark of the Loon to a friend to read and she told me she couldn’t put it down. I chose to believe her and embarked on a new path.

What are some of the writing tools you have learned along that way that has helped you?

I’m a panster at heart, which means I don’t know how a book will end until I’m at least halfway there. At first, I wrote knowing nothing about future events in the plot. But having a clue about what’s going to happen before it does helps an author write faster, so now I do a bit of outlining before each book, usually the first 10 chapters or so. That way I have to backtrack less, revise less, and it gives me an opportunity to think up cool scenes I might otherwise miss. Outlining is one of the best production-boosting tools I’ve learned.

Is there a particular message you would like to give to your readers?

I write mystery novels that include elements of cozy mysteries and women’s fiction. So far, all these stories are set in California. They each feature strong, independent female characters who are professional and/or amateur sleuths. My novels are both character and plot-driven, include both friend and romantic relationship elements, but no graphic sex or gore. My protagonists are flawed and smart and imperfect but manage to improve, both personally and professionally, in some way, through every story line. Think whodunit suspense solved by smart women!

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A message from indieBRAG:

We are delighted that Stephanie has chosen to interview Molly Greene who is the author of, Mark of the Loon, our medallion honoree at indieBRAG. To be awarded a B.R.A.G. Medallion ®, a book must receive unanimous approval by a group of our readers. It is a daunting hurdle and it serves to reaffirm that a book such as, Mark of the Loon, merits the investment of a reader’s time and money.

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